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Today's DAP headlines:

C|Net Asia reviews the potentially awesome iRiver U10, Apple no longer allows businesses and websites (other the ones directly related to the actual company) to use the term "iPod" in their respective names and NeoSol slips some data on the upcoming CP-3550 PVR through our window. Meanwhile, a similar device - Cowon's A2 - sees its first of probably many, many (Korean) in-depth reviews.

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When we first saw the iRiver U10, most of us were rather baffled with amazement. Shortly after that the U10 received widespread cheers for its innovative design and seemingly crisp-clear color screen, resulting in a small and relatively short "U10 hype". By the time it actually made it to the production lines, many people considered themselves to be "oversaturated with U10 information". Despite said phenomenon, it's still interesting to see the first U10 reviews pop up here and there. C|Net Asia also took a shot at iRiver's stylish little flash-based DAP slash PMP. Their verdict: 8 out of 10 stars and the following summary:

The bottom line: The U10 may be the best MP3 player in a long time to take on the mantle of an iPod killer, but its high cost may just price it out of the market.

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Starting off with a new website dedicated to iPods (or alike)? Here's a tip: don't include the actual word "iPod" in your domain name. Apple recently decided that they've been receiving enough free publicity throughout the years. Companies and websites not directly related to the motherbrain (Apple itself) have been encouraged to lose the "iPod" part in their names before - a perfect example of this would have to be iPodlounge, which changed its name into iLounge not too long ago. Looks as if Apple's after all the other ones as well, now. EverythingiPod and iPodLife are among the current set of victims.

This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.

We've seen NeoSol showing off their upcoming stuff at the IFA (Berlin) exhibition, a couple of weeks ago by now. They had some very nifty machinery in the works - basically regular iPod-sized PMPs with all kinds of extras (t.v. tuners and crisp clear OLED screens, for instance). There's also this more "traditional PVR" (Portable Video recorder) coming up, called the CP-3550. It's not as compact as aforementioned prototypes, but in return comes with a 16.7 million color, 3.5-inch TFT LCD. There's a basic storage capacity of 20GB, the characteristic t.v. tuner, a bucket full of supported audio & video formats and USB On-the-Go compatibility. We're not sure when it'll make it to anywhere, though - as is often the case with these South-Korean super gadgets.

This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.

Whereas NeoSol has been around in the Portable Video Atmosphere for about a year by now, Cowon (also based in South-Korea) mainly focused on audio-specific technology. By introducing the iAudio X5, things started to nudge towards "video playback" a bit as well... And now, there's the A2. A clean, lean mean video machine that comes with a 4 inch (480 x 272 pixel), 16:9 format TFT LCD that's able to display 16 million colors in total. The A2 also has this rather immensely powerful battery which allows it to play videos for about 10 hours in a row. The list of specs just goes on and on and... on. By now, the first (Korean) reviews are starting to pop up here and there. Rumor has it that the western society still has to wait for the A2's release for another month or so.

Well, that was it for today, ladies and gentlemen. See you again tomorrow!