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Today's DAP headlines:

There's an in-depth look at what's going in Shenzen (China), the heart of DAP-cloning land. Next to that, we've built our own ghetto-style lanyard for the iPod nano: enter the nanyard. Our French buddies kept us in the loop on Creative's Zen micro Photo too, the iUbi PMP-2010 re-enters the portable video recorder arena and we're asking ourselves... "Where the heck is that Archos Gmini-500?".

This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.

Of all places in China, why would one pick Shenzen, Guangdong as a basis for any DAP-related article? Well, the answer can simply found within the statistics: the province of Guangdong is responsible for 80% of China's entire DAP production, with the city of Shenzen accounting for one-third of that percentage. Nowadays, said city (located near the border with Hong Kong) is mainly associated with many of those weird, cheap-looking DAP clones. It used to be different, though - very different. There used to be as many as 800 DAP companies within the city's borders, back in the heydays (2001) - they would generate as much as 30 bucks of profit per unit. How quickly things can change is reflected by the dry numbers again: there are "only" some 250 companies left and profit margings have fallen to a measly 10 Chinese Yuan ($1.24) per unit. Just read the entire article if you know more.

This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.

One way of "wearing" the iPod nano is by attaching it to a lanyard - allowing one to pimp it around while not losing one's earphones. Problem being: the lanyard as put on display in the Apple store is hella-expensive plus you'll have to make do with the standard earphones. Because we like the concepts of "being able to choose" and "saving money", we got up and moved over to the DAPreview workbench. A drill, some spray paint, the occasional hammer, knife and pieces of tape as well as some new curse words (among others) did the trick. The result: a $7 ghetto-style lanyard, also known as "the nanyard". Dig it.

This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.

Creative gets its usual slice of the DAP Delights pie, because our French colleagues over at GenerationMP3 managed to obtain one of the first 8GB Zen Micro Photos out there. There's also some news on a few of Creative's new portable docking stations (TravelDock and TravelSound series), as well as the final word on "the Zen Neeon making it to Europe" - it's not going to happen.

This image was lost some time after publication.

Our seemingly random-PVR-of-the-day is iUbi's PMP-2010. A dumb name for this particular device, given the fact that its (rather disappointing) predecessor was dubbed "PMP-2020" - plus the fact that "PMP" stands for "Portable Multimedia Player", while the 2010 clearly supports video recording as well. Anyway, despite the rather weird design (there's that bulgy battery compartiment) and stiff (upcoming) competition, the PMP-2010 is no lost yet. We had the change to play around with it some months ago, and that 4-inch screen looked absolutely delightful.

This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.

Now, if you really insist on calling something a PMP, there's your typical Archos Gmini-500 (dubbed "not so mini anymore") by many). This thing looks about exactly the same as its older sibling, the AV500 series, but Archos scratched the video recording functionality to cut back on costs. Only thing is - what has become of the Gmini-500?

Ok, that's DAP Delights for today - see you again tomorrow!