Can you recognize popular brand logos even if they are in Chinese?

Illustration for article titled Can you recognize popular brand logos even if they are in Chinese?

A good logo should be easily and universally recognized, even if it were written in Chinese. But sometimes it doesn't work out that way. Chinatown, a project by Mehmet Gozetlik, shows how a famous logo can look both foreign and yet still somehow be recognizable at the same time. It's like getting a glimpse of an alternate reality.

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Most of the logos you should be able to instantly recognize because they invade our brains on a daily basis (MasterCard, Starbucks, etc.). Other logos look funny in Chinese because our brain doesn't know how to process it (NASA, the Tube, etc.). And a few text-centric logos takes a beat to realize what they are. It really tickles the brain.

Gozetlik explains his project:

Chinatown is a Chinese translation of the trademarks in a graphical way. It's a carefully arranged series of artworks showcasing 20 well-known western brand logos with maintained visual and narrative continuity.

'Chinatown' pushes viewers to ask themselves what it means to see, hear, and become fully aware. 'Chinatown' also demonstrates our strangeness to 1.35 billion people in the world, when you can't read Chinese.

The neon lighting of the logos are great. You can see more here.

Illustration for article titled Can you recognize popular brand logos even if they are in Chinese?
Illustration for article titled Can you recognize popular brand logos even if they are in Chinese?
Illustration for article titled Can you recognize popular brand logos even if they are in Chinese?
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Illustration for article titled Can you recognize popular brand logos even if they are in Chinese?
Illustration for article titled Can you recognize popular brand logos even if they are in Chinese?
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Illustration for article titled Can you recognize popular brand logos even if they are in Chinese?
Illustration for article titled Can you recognize popular brand logos even if they are in Chinese?
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And here's a video of one of these neon light logos being made:

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Mehmet Gözetlik is the executive art director and Co-Founder of Antrepo. He is also a typography instructor at the Bilgi University.and a creative consultant in ID Istanbul.

You can follow his work on his website, Behance and Twitter.


This is part of a series in which we are featuring really cool 2D or 3D illustrations and animations. If you are an illustrator or animator with high quality work, please drop me a line here.

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DISCUSSION

I don't really get that this is supposed to say or prove. First of all, recognition of symbols goes beyond lines and colors. The typography itself plays a huge part too. In this case, he reduced everything to lines without any specific attention paid to its "thickness". Therefore whether it's the graphics (shapes) or the text (fonts), it's lacks depth in the topic he's trying to discuss.

Secondly, the Chinese texts don't directly translate to the brands they originally represents. For example, the Chinese text on NASA logo simply says "astronaut", Lego "Toy", UPS "Express delivery", Goodyear"Tyre without inner tube", Mastercard "credit card" and so on. It doesn't even try to represent the "Brand" in Chinese ways, let alone any kind of transformation.

Thirdly, there are already hundreds of millions of brands and graphics translated to Chinese available on the market that you can just google. So what exactly has this "designer" done?

For me, I felt like my time was wasted.