Sitting in a 737 Jet Engine Chair Turns Anyone Into a Supervillain

Illustration for article titled Sitting in a 737 Jet Engine Chair Turns Anyone Into a Supervillain

Mother Teresa? Gandhi? It doesn’t matter how nice or upstanding a human being you might be, the second you plunk yourself down in a chair made from the remains of a Boeing 737's massive jet engine, you’ll immediately be mistaken for a comic book-caliber supervillain. Whether or not that’s a bad thing is up to you.

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Illustration for article titled Sitting in a 737 Jet Engine Chair Turns Anyone Into a Supervillain

The fact that Fallen Furniture doesn’t a list a price for this amazing creation—which features a polished aluminum swiveling base and an interior upholstered with black leather—is the least of your concerns. Even if you can afford one, you’ll then have to deal with the logistics of getting it into your office or home.

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Because, and not surprisingly, Boeing didn’t take into consideration the size of your front door when ordering engines powerful enough to get a 737 off the ground. You can always knock down a wall, or just build a new home around the chair. Supervillains can do whatever they want, right?

[Fallen Furniture via Home Crux]

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DISCUSSION

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The dimensions shown on their poster, and a total of many dull hours spent staring out the window of a 737, makes me think I could get it in through the patio slider easily. (Doubt it’d fit my wallet, though!)

Weight is another issue. The thing is built to withstand forces an order of magnitude greater than anything usually imposed upon furniture. I’d take a SWAG at half a ton, assuming that it’s from an old “737 Classic” and that that means more aluminum alloy rather than composites.

It is a beautiful thing and quite a conversation piece as well if you want a deep dive into why it looks that way — the “hamster pouch” nacelle was an ingenious invention that got the 737 into the era of fuel-efficient high-bypass turbofans.