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AT&T and Cricket Hit Back Against T-Mobile With Their Own $15 Data Plans

Illustration for article titled ATT and Cricket Hit Back Against T-Mobile With Their Own $15 Data Plans
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Earlier this week, T-Mobile launched its Connect plan earlier than expected giving subscribers access to 2GB of mobile data for $15 per month. But now, AT&T and Cricket are hitting back with their own $15-a-month phone plans along with a few other efforts to help people who may be struggling due to covid-19.

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The new $15 a month package will be available today from both AT&T and Cricket as a prepaid plan that includes 2GB of data per month. However, one important difference between AT&T and Cricket’s new offering compared to the T-Mobile Connect plan is that after you use 2GB of mobile data, AT&T and Cricket will continue to give you access to data (albeit at throttled speeds) while T-Mobile’s Connect plan has a hard shutoff after you max out your data.

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Elsewhere, AT&T is hoping to alleviate concerns about people potentially running out of data during the pandemic by giving existing AT&T and Cricket customers an additional 10GB of data per month for the next 60 days (two billing cycles). This includes both postpaid and prepaid plans and covers both standard mobile data and mobile hotspot data, but critically excludes the new $15 a month 2GB plan. That means you can’t sign up for AT&T and Cricket’s new super cheap plan and instantly get 12GB of data for just $15.

Additionally, both existing subscribers and new customers who sign up for AT&T’s Unlimited Plus plan before April 26th will get an extra 10GB of mobile hotspot data for 60 days, with people who sign up after April 26th getting that extra 10GB of data for just 30 days.

While a lot of people are staying home due to the virus and largely relying on their home wi-fi for data, it’s still nice to see AT&T add a bit of additional flexibility for those relying on their phone data.

Senior reporter at Gizmodo, formerly Tom's Guide and Laptop Mag. Was an archery instructor and a penguin trainer before that.

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DISCUSSION

Yeah but then I’d have to have a plan with AT&T, and speaking from dealing with AT&T both on a personal and a professional level: fuck that. T Mobile isn’t perfect by any means but I’d rather stick with them.

Although hopefully this encourages T Mobile to not have a hard cutoff after 2 GB (not that I will be switching to that plan, but it would be better for people on it). Best outcome of this scenario.