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This week at TreeHugger: Finally stemming the tide of solar laptop bags that don't charge 'em up, the Eclipse Solar Gear Hybrid Notebook Case has an onboard charging inverter and a battery pack that can charge a laptop as well as PDAs, cell phones, MP3 players, GPS units and satellite radio systems. Coming soon to every Treehugger's desk: the solar-powered monitor. NEC has teamed up with Canada's Carmanah Technologies to offer a solar powered system for its entire line of monitors. Researchers at the Lund Institute of Technology are attempting to incorporate green driving options into satellite navigation systems. By including factors like road quality, driving speed and typical traffic flows, the researchers hope to decrease the amount of gasoline needed for travel. Lastly, the EU got the lead out first, publishing a law called RoHS for Restriction of Hazardous Substances. Now China is following in the EU's footsteps with the long-winded "Measures for Administration of the Pollution Control of Electronic Information Products"; when will the USA begin to exercise leadership in the greening of global technology?

We've seen lots of slick laptop bags that offer capacity to charge your gadgets with solar power, but none have been able to charge what they carry...until now. The Eclipse Solar Gear Hybrid Notebook Case features an onboard charging inverter and a battery pack that can charge a laptop as well as PDAs, cell phones, MP3 players, GPS units and satellite radio systems. The Hybrid Notebook Case also has an "integrated cooling solution" intended to improve your computer's energy efficiency. Innovus Designs, creator of the case, won an award for the design from the Consumer Electronics Assoc. this year, and plans to release the product soon in different sizes and body materials.

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Sticking with solar, we found a new gadget we hope will soon be coming to the desks of TreeHuggers everywhere: NEC has teamed up with Canada's Carmanah Technologies to offer a solar powered system for its entire line of monitors. After crunching a few numbers, it looks like the system could run a modern laptop for 29 hours or so on a full charge, to say nothing for its ability to keep a monitor buzzing.

From solar power to green driving: researchers at the Lund Institute of Technology are attempting to incorporate green driving options into satellite navigation systems. By including factors like road quality, driving speed and typical traffic flows, the researchers hope to decrease the amount of gasoline needed for travel. The new system uses existing databases and already has shown promising results; several test runs have reduced gasoline consumption by an average of 8.2%.

Lastly, the EU got the lead out first, enacting RoHS for Restriction of Hazardous Substances in Europe last summer; now China is following in the EU's footsteps with their "Measures for Administration of the Pollution Control of Electronic Information Products" (say that three times fast). The law will target the same six hazardous substances which are regulated by the EU law: heavy metals cadmium, lead, mercury, and hexavalent chromium as well as two flame retardants, PBB and PBDE. The marking is required in March of this year, and while the EU only regulates it if you have to plug it in, the Chinese draft list of electronic information products includes materials used in the manufacturing process to produce electrical equipment as well. The only question remains: when will the USA begin to exercise leadership in the greening of global technology?

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TreeHugger's EcoModo column appears every Tuesday on Gizmodo.