This week at TreeHugger: Maggie Gyllenhaal hosted the Academy Awards' Scientific and Technical Awards banquet last Saturday night, where they give out all the boring technical awards and show ten seconds of the event on the real Oscar show. A well-deserved statue went to a team of twelve at Dolby Labs for an idea that has saved 1,200 pounds of silver and 40 million gallons of water each year. President Bush took a minute to peek under the hood of two electric cars parked on the White House lawn; the ready-to-drive modified Toyota Prius plug-in and Phoenix Motorcars' new pickup were his proof that the country will use 20 percent less gas in the next 10 years. Australian company Copycat Solar offers up the PedalPower+, a hub-style dynamo and bonus solar panel that uses pedal and sun power to juice up iPods and other mp3 players, digital cameras and PDAs. Lastly, the enterprising Navarro Vineyards has figured out how to cut their fuel use in half: sheep. Yep, baby doll sheep, who keep the "lanes" between the vines clear without munching on the crop (they aren't tall enough to reach). Fertilizing the soil is just an added bonus.

Green geeks got their moment in the spotlight this past Saturday night when Maggie Gyllenhaal hosted the Academy Awards' Scientific and Technical Awards banquet, the event probably best known for giving out all the boring technical awards and then showing ten seconds of the event on the real Oscar show. A well-deserved statue went to a team of twelve at Dolby Labs for an idea that has saved 1,200 pounds of silver and 40 million gallons of water each year. And how's that, you ask? Until recently a white light was used to read the sound track from film, and silver had to be added to block out unwanted noise because the color dyes did not stop enough light. The Dolby people had the idea of changing the tungsten light to a red LED, eliminating the need for silver. They then had to convince theatre owners to convert to red-light readers, and the classic 2001 Kirstin Dunst epic, Get Over It, was the first cyan soundtrack movie. We hope all twelve got to thank their moms.

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Last week, President Bush peered under the hood of two electric cars parked on the White House lawn; he got a good look at the guts of a modified Toyota Prius and an electric pickup built by Phoenix Motorcars. The Prius on display had a high-power lithium-ion battery that'll power the car for about 40 miles and recharge in five hours. The white four-door pickup, made by Phoenix Motorcars, uses a battery with a beefier range of 130 miles that can be recharged in about 10 minutes with a rapid-charging unit or trickle-charged overnight with its onboard charger.

Australian company Copycat Solar offers up the PedalPower+, a hub-style dynamo and bonus solar panel that uses pedal and sun power to juice up iPods and other mp3 players, digital cameras and PDAs. The PedalPower+ has an inbuilt battery, which accepts changing from both bottle or dynamo, and gadgets can be in use while being charged by an active cyclist. But wait; there's more! The three-ounce charger can be removed from its handle bar cradle for use as an LED light. So climb on, strap in, crank up and power your gadgets with a few turns of the crank.

Lastly, the enterprising Navarro Vineyards has figured out how to cut their fuel use in half: sheep. Yep, baby doll sheep, who reduce the need for mowing by keeping the "lanes" between the vines clear as they chow down on the grass and weeds that grow in between. They aren't tall enough to munch on the crop, so the precious grapes are left to grow to their full pre-wine potential. Fertilizing the soil is just an added bonus.

TreeHugger's EcoModo column appears every Tuesday on Gizmodo.