This week at TreeHugger: Domino's wants to save on gas for the untold number of miles it clocks delivering pizzas to the hungry mouths of the world via its network of more than 8,000 franchised shops, and they're doing it with the all-electric Xebra. The residents of St. Louis Park, Minnesota, may be the first in the US to receive solar-powered, wireless Internet service. Speaking of solar, Motorola, Inc. has deployed the first-ever wind- and solar-powered cell network system to operate MTC Namibia's GSM cell site at Dordabis village in the Khomas region of Namibia. Lastly, not all TreeHuggers agree about the benefits of wearing bike helmets, but here's one you can't argue with: being alive after your head gets run over by a truck.

Domino's Pizza franchises in Las Vegas have been testing Zap Xebra electric vehicles for pie delivery. Part of a new pilot program, Domino's wants to lessen its carbon footprint and save on gas for the untold number of miles it clocks delivering pizzas to the hungry mouths of the world via its network of more than 8,000 franchised shops. The Xebra is a three-wheeled, all-electric city car (40 mph maximum speed—probably a good thing in this case), that can charge off of a typical 110 Volt outlet. We're waiting for word on how widespread the use of EVs will be by "the recognized world leader in pizza delivery."

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The residents of St. Louis Park, Minnesota, may be the first in the US to receive solar-powered, wireless Internet service. The service, run by the city, will require about 400 poles with solar panels attached to operate the Wi-Fi network. Of course, some folks are worried that these poles will have an ugly side effect: They might be placed in their lawn, or in line their with picture window. The city is working with residents to minimize these effects. The low-tech solution—painting the silver poles brown—has already been approved. You know, to look kind of like a tree (wink, wink). The service is expected to start next fall; customers would pay monthly fees between $15 to $20 depending on the level of service.

Motorola, Inc. has deployed the world's first wind- and solar-powered cell system, to operate MTC Namibia's GSM cell site at Dordabis village in the Khomas region of Namibia. The trial with MTC Namibia supports the African operator's strategy for increased voice and data service coverage in rural areas of Namibia. By incorporating renewable energy solutions into communication networks, Motorola is trialing this solution as a feasible option for operators instead of utilizing costly fuel generators or waiting long periods for a mains grid connection. Motorola has been working with the GSM Association on this project, which was announced at 3GSM Barcelona in February of this year.

Lastly, while the subject of the benefits of wearing bike helmets have created some heated arguments before, no one can argue with the benefit of being alive after your head gets run over by a truck, as Ryan Lipscomb of Madison, Wisconsin, recently discovered. "I didn't see it coming, but I sure felt it roll over my head. It feels really strange to have a truck run over your head." Well said.

TreeHugger's EcoModo column appears every Tuesday on Gizmodo.