This week at TreeHugger: This universal on/off switch for your whole house aims to make the green way the most convenient way. Lightning Motors' electric motorcycle does 0-60 in around 3 seconds, hits close to 100 mph at top speed, and has about a 100-mile range at cruise.

We double-dip in advances in gadgetry for Toyota's Prius: first, the Lithium Technology Corporation unveiled a plug-in Prius that can average over 125 miles to the gallon; second, a company called Solar Electrical Vehicles is specializing in adding a convex solar roof to hybrid cars like the Toyota Prius, Highlander Hybrid and the Ford Escape Hybrid, adding all-electric capability to the gas-sippers. Lastly, you gotta hand it to the Amish: though they have yet to adopt modern conveniences like cars and electricity, they are way ahead of the curve when it comes to newfangled solar technology.

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Fight vampire power with the push of a button with this universal on/off switch for your whole house. Anything non-essential could be wired through it, enabling you to easily turn off all those standby devices in one hit. Aiming to make the green way the most convenient way, the House-off Switch was part of a larger project to encourage green action among the lazy.

Lightning Motors' electric motorcycle, a Yamaha R1 that has been modified to be powered by lithium-ion batteries, does 0-60 in about 3 seconds, hits close to 100 mph at top speed, and has about a 100-mile range at cruise. The entire engine is missing. So are the tailpipes, radiator, gas cap, transmission and clutch. In their place: a wall of yellow batteries, an AC regenerative motor, an electric throttle and a three-pronged plug, which pokes out from the frame and connects to a standard outlet. Sadly, the Lightning Lithium is just a prototype, but you can get your own conversion courtesy of the boys at Electric Motorsport in about 30 days.

Because two hybrid stories are better than one: a plug-in Prius that can average over 125 miles to the gallon has been unveiled by the Lithium Technology Corporation. This has been made possible by the company's new lithium iron phosphate cells, the largest available on the market, coupled with a new battery management system. Part two: a company called Solar Electrical Vehicles is specializing in adding a convex solar roof to hybrid cars like the Toyota Prius, Highlander Hybrid and the Ford Escape Hybrid. The solar modules are rated at 200-300 watts, and this power is utilized to charge a supplemental battery. With the solar roof, the Toyota Prius can operate up to 20 miles per day in electric mode, thus improving fuel economy by up to 29%, depending on driving habits and conditions. The system costs $2000-$4000 and the payback time is said to be 2-3 years.

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Lastly, you gotta hand it to the Amish: though they have yet to adopt modern conveniences like cars and electricity, they are way ahead of the curve when it comes to newfangled solar technology. Holmes County, Ohio, which is known for having the world's largest Amish population, is already a hotbed of solar power: an estimated 80% of Amish families have embraced the use of photovoltaic panels. Solar power has become the de facto replacement for electricity in appliances that run the gamut from sewing machines to light batteries on their horse-drawn buggies.

TreeHugger's EcoModo column appears every Tuesday on Gizmodo.