Click to viewHere's a video of Lockheed Martin's MULE advanced robotic vehicle in action, complete with Joes and baddies shooting at each other while the MULE fires its machine gun, gives away free rockets to an enemy tank and pinpoints targets for ballistic missiles. It gives you a good idea of what this amazing machine would do in real-life missions. And you gotta love the A-Team-style effects and music. Full explanation by Mr. T right after the jump.

Listen up you fools and fast-forward to the middle of that video to see some crack commando action in the streets of Iraqistan. See? I tell ya, I pity the fool who goes out tryin' a' take over da world, then runs home cryin' to his momma when he sees the MULE coming!

I like the MULE. It could have been betta' with a black paint job and a few more ghetto armor plates. But I LIKE IT ANYWAY, DAMMIT. And I like that Ramirez guy controlling it with his gamepad thingie! I like it because they can go together thru any obstacle using its articulated wheels with individual in-hub motors and it ain't flying. Just like my van and me! Ramirez could have used more gold chains, though. But that sergeant is on the jazz, man!

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The MULE in that video is the MULE/ARV-Assault Light vehicle, which weights 3.5 tons and comes with an automatic line-of-sight gun, and anti-tank rockets. "Heavy firepower to go anywhere with the infantry," they say. Some big mutha badass beast I say. They also have anti-mine and transport versions, but I like my suckers to kick ass.

Lockheed Martin says that "it will allow soldiers to use technology to perform a number of dull, dirty and dangerous jobs, freeing troops to focus more effectively on the success of their mission." And maybe build a tank with empty oil barrels and a spare truck engine. I CAN DO BOTH, YOU FOOLS!

As you probably know, it had its first successful test some days ago Then it climbed a 30-inch step and bridged a 70-inch gap without any operator intervention. The final version will "traverse side slopes greater than 40 percent, ford water to depths over half a meter and overpass obstacles as high as half a meter, while compensating for varying payload weights and center-of-gravity locations."

I tell ya, those Lockheed Martin dudes are on some serious Jazz. [Lockheed Martin]