This week at TreeHugger: We revisit Potenco's ingenious pull-cord generator, get some hands-on experience with it and get up close and personal with its human power generation goodness. Unipixel has developed a new design for a handheld display that it claims is 60% more efficient than conventional displays, one that would almost double the battery life of a cell phone.

Don't sit too close to your monitor: a new study conducted by scientists at the Imperial College London has demonstrated that electrical fields from various electronic devices โ€” they call it "electronic smog" โ€” can cause asthma, influenza and several other respiratory diseases. Lastly, take a gander at Ktrak, a two-wheeled ass-kicker that really puts the mountain in bike.

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In an ideal world, most of our energy needs would be met by cheap, simple, yet elegant devices like Potenco's revolutionary pull-cord generator (PCG). We've raved about this power generator before and - during our brief romp through this year's WIRED Nextfest - had the chance to meet Colin Bulthaup, the startup's ambitious CEO, and test the device out for ourselves. The verdict: it's awesome.

Those of you who passed on the frame rate trick we covered a little while back to extend your video-playing device's battery life might find this next story more interesting. Unipixel, a startup company based in Woodlands, TX, has developed a new design for a handheld display that it claims is 60% more efficient than conventional displays - one that would almost double the battery life of a cell phone (such as Apple's iPhone).

Your parents always told you that staying indoors with your face glued to the TV set would do little to improve your health. Well, it looks like they finally have some evidence to back up their claims: a new study conducted by scientists at the Imperial College London has demonstrated that electrical fields from various electronic devices โ€” they call it "electronic smog" โ€” can cause asthma, influenza and several other respiratory diseases. The smog has long been denounced by campaigners worried about the rapid proliferation of cell phones, Wi-Fi systems and other gizmos in our increasingly connected society.

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Lastly, snow is probably not the first thing on many of readers minds right now. But no matter. For the makers of the Ktrak say this rear track drive bicycle is equally at home in sand as the winter white stuff. Strictly speaking its not their bike, but yours. They simply supply the kit and you take off the wheels and affix the caterpillar-like drive to the rear, and if so inclined, a ski runner to the front. It really puts the mountain in bike.

TreeHugger's EcoModo column appears every Tuesday on Gizmodo.