This week at TreeHugger: Sony upgraded its ODO series of digital cameras with a funky new prototype: the Twirl N' Take. Sure, CES was remote-clicking fun, but how green was it? They did have biodegradable cutlery...The big boys at Sharp, Panasonic and Toshiba took advantage of being in the same room at CES to announce that they've joined forces to create a new electronics mega-recycling company.

Lastly, the number of teenagers dying in Australia as a result of
listening to their iPods while crossing the road is beginning to reach "epidemic proportions," apparently. Don't say we didn't warn you.

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Following the initial fun and games begotten by the first round of the hand-cranking gadgets, Sony has upgraded to the ODO Twirl N' Take prototype. Twirl N' Take is a digital camera which sits in a clever flowerpot-looking USB cradle, making the most of the sleek stem-and-circle design. The camera is built into the handle, and in the round end, Twirl N' Take has a built-in power meter, so you can keep track of how the charging progress is going. Ironically, there is no display screen on the device itself, presumably to save power (and cranks). That flowerpot will come in handy if you want to see how your snapshots look.

Okay, so CES was good for some huge TV announcements, Bill Gates' retirement hullaballo and a few fun 'n games, but how green was it? After all, 15 - 20% of a typical home's energy use these days comes from electronic gadgets, and a 50-inch plasma TV uses as much as your refrigerator, but they used electronic press packets (instead of paper), biodegradable utensils and so forth. Isn't that worth anything?

The big boys at Sharp, Panasonic and Toshiba took advantage of being in the same room at CES to announce that they've joined forces to create a new electronics recycling company, called the Electronic Manufacturers Recycling Management Company (MRM). The company was formed to help other manufacturers and state and local governments manage electronics recycling programs across the US. Formed in response to some stringent regulations passed last year in Minnesota, the company is working to help bring companies up to the new code, having collected 750 tons of junk in the first five months, and it's just the tip of the iceberg.

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Lastly, as the number of teenagers dying in Australia as a result of
listening to their iPods while crossing the road reaches "epidemic proportions" (seriously!), Australian ad agency DDB Sydney dreamed up a little ad campaign for the New South Wales Police to help shock (?) the young hooligans into turning down the tunes.

TreeHugger's EcoModo column appears every Tuesday on Gizmodo.