This week at TreeHugger: An organization called The Greener Grass has an idea that, if it works, would mean you've broken, donated, thrown away, recycled or otherwise replaced your last cell phone. Another day, another sleek new hydrogen-fueled concept car unveiled: this one, the Lifecar, promises to be the ultimate "green" sports car.

For telecommuters and self-employed home-office dwellers (not to mention bloggers) who don't have the luxury of a dedicated home office, having a suitable space to work that isn't a desk next to your bed (or your bed) can be tricky, but we've found it: it's called Trunk Station. Lastly, how many plastic bags did it take to make this suit?

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You have a cell phone, and, if you're anything like the average cell user, it'll get broken, donated, traded in, thrown away, recycled or otherwise replaced within the next 18 months or so. No matter how you slice it, that's a lot of plastic and other miscellanea that will eventually end up downcycled or in the landfill. An organization called The Greener Grass thinks they have a solution for this; they've dreamed up LINC, a smart phone with all the advanced capabilities — cell phone, a media player, a web browser, GPS, downloadable content, Bluetooth, wifi, etc. — of today's smartphones, with one twist. Instead of buying the phone, you lease it until you break it or it becomes obsolete, and then you get a new one. Nice, but will it ever be anything but vaporware?

Another day, another sleek new hydrogen-fueled concept car unveiled: this one, the Lifecar, promises to be the ultimate "green" sports car. The ÂŁ1.9m joint project between the British government and Morgan Motor Company will be officially rolled out at the upcoming Geneva Motor Show, scheduled for March 6 - 16. Inspired by the design of the Morgan Aero-8 roadster, the Lifecar boasts a top speed of nearly 100 mph and a maximum range of 250 miles (400 km); according to Morgan boss Matthew Parkin, the futuristic car should be able to do 0-60 mph in 7 seconds.

For telecommuters and self-employed home-office dwellers (not to mention bloggers) who don't have the luxury of a dedicated home office, having a suitable space to work that isn't a desk next to your bed can be tricky. It's important to have space dedicated to work, or at least somewhere to easily stash your stuff if your dining table or sofa doubles as your home office. Straight from Japan, the Trunk Station fills both needs, creating a little half-cube and enough space to work on a computer, store some files and other useful stuff you'll need to get from 9 to 5; when your workday is through, fold it up and roll it away, out of sight and out of mind.

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Here's a question you probably don't ask yourself every day: How many plastic bottles did it take to make this suit? Give up? Thirty. Really. Fit for the pages of GQ, international clothier Bagir is bringing sexy back for anyone who thought wearing a suit of plastic bags would look stupid. The company — which clothes one in six British men — has just taken post-consumer waste to a new level through its EcoGir Recycled Suit. Gives new meaning to taking out the trash, boys.

TreeHugger's EcoModo column appears every Tuesday on Gizmodo.