This week at T-Hugger: The environment is destroyed thanks to fools who turn up the heat and open the windows at the same time. Mr. T has no pity for those fools. Get a brain, suckas. Protect yo environment. Buy hybrid cars! Recycle! Drink your milk. Do your homework. Stay away from drugs. Uuuuuuugggh.

This week at TreeHugger: Osram shouts 'victory' with a warm white OLED breakthrough (efficiency of 46 lm/Watt!). Spain broke wind power records last week with 40.8% of total electricity demand. Thin-film solar is coming of age with a new efficiency record of 19.9%, and California wants to turn big-box stores into solar power plants.

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Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are very promising. They are more efficient than incandescents without the downsides of CFLs (fragility, mercury), and they have the potential to become less expensive than regular LEDs. Osram announced a breakthrough with the production of a warm white OLEDs with an efficiency of 46 lm/W and a life of more than 5000 hours at a brightness of 1000 cd/m2. That's close to the efficiency of fluorescent lamps, and more than twice that of incandescent lamps.

Last year Spain's wind power production record was 27%. That seemed like a lot, but a week ago, Spain's wind turbines produced 40.8% of total demand, or 9,862 megawatts of power. Spain's wind power industry currently enjoys a 30% annual growth rate. No recession there...

The US National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has created thin film solar panels that are very close to competing with their more traditional silicon-based cousins. "The copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin-film solar cell recently reached 19.9 percent efficiency in testing at the lab, setting a new world record."

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Southern California Edison (SCE) wants to build a 250-megawatt solar farm with a twist: It will be distributed among many commercial rooftops, starting with southern California's Inland Empire, San Bernardino and Riverside counties. They are planning to install 1 megawatt per week starting in August. Once the project is finished, it will take up 65,000,000 square feet of roofs that would otherwise be unused and produce enough clean energy to supply about 162,000 homes.

TreeHugger's EcoModo column appears every Tuesday on Gizmodo.