This week at TreeHugger: Sports car maker Lotus built a "Concept Ice Vehicle" for a trans-antarctic scientific expedition. It's kind of like a cross between a skidoo and an ultralight plane. This one is just kind "What the...?": A reader sent us photos of a Hägglunds Bandvagn truck (?!?) with the TreeHugger logo on it. We admit it's pretty badass. Nicole Kuepper, a 23 years old PhD student, might have just found a way to make solar cells using things like pizza ovens, nails polish and inkjet printers. Finally, Intel's next CPU, Nehalem (or i7 now) will include a 1 million transistors (as much as a 486) PCU dedicated to power management. Researchers taking part in the Moon-Regan expedition have a new very cool toy. The biofuel-powered Concept Ice Vehicle (CIV), made by Lotus, will be used to cross the coldest contintent, Antarctica, to raise awareness about "how Antarctica’s fate affects the whole environment." Live feeds and results from scientific experiments will be available on the web and used in classrooms around the world. The processes developed by Nicole Kuepper for the iJET solar cell don't require the very expensive clean rooms and high-temperature ovens of traditional solar panel manufacturing plants, but rather pizza ovens, nail polish and inkjet printers, making them accessible to developing countries. Intel has announced at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) that i7 a.k.a. Nehalem, its next generation CPU, will include a Power Control Unti (PCU) dedicated to making the chip more efficient. About 1 million transistors, as much as a 486 CPU used, will be used for the sole purpose of managing power using temperature sensor data and software feedback (OS requests, etc). TreeHugger's EcoModo column appears every Tuesday on Gizmodo.