Equipment: Canon EOS Digital Rebel XSI
Lens: Canon EFS 18-55
Exposure time 1/800 at F5
ISO: 800
Manual Focus
Taken at full sunlight with flat black back drop. Tripod used with remote shutter release. Water dropped using measuring cup onto slate stones.
-Anthony Dedal

Advertisement


Equipment: Canon 7D, Canon 22mm - 70mm USM II L f/2.8 Lens, Canon 580 EX II, Gitzo Traveler Tripod, Manfroto Tripod
Settings: F-Stop of f/8, Exposure time 1/10 sec, ISO-250, Exposure bias 0 step, focal length 70 mm
Technique: I really wanted to do something different, most of the water drop photos I have seen are of a single color so I wanted to try and get a variety of colors. I setup a white bowl on a chair and filled it with water. I attached a multi-color holographic reflective piece of wrapping paper to the back of the chair. I remotely bounced the flash off of the paper so that it reflected the colors into the water. I used the standard plastic bag with water and a pin hole in it to obtain the water drops. It took hundreds of photos to get the right one...
-皇帝 Omar Ihsan


Hello. I have tried to catch an classic transparent clear water drop
from big height. For droping I used my sister with eye dropper =).
Good reaction became the main things. I used a mirror, black background,
and one external flash.
NIKON D80 with Tamron 28-75 mm
1/2500s, f/5.6, iso200.
Flash Nikon SB800 Manual 1/1
-Philipp Guschin

Advertisement


This water drop shot was created by filling up a casserole dish with water and then photographing droplets from the kitchen faucet so I could easily control the flow and timing of the droplets. I used a tripod-mounted Nikon D90 with an AF Zoom-Nikkor 35-70mm f/2.8D lens and an external Nikon SB-600. The flash was bounced off two red and blue pieces of paper to color the water. Focusing was done manually. This was one of 300 pictures taken over a period of an hour.
Exposure information (manual exposure): 1/125 second, f16, ISO 200, 70mm focal length. Flash exposure: 1/16 power.
-Mac Mirabile

Advertisement


Canon XSi on burst mode, 18-55mm kit lens.
I got a clear glass bowl, put it on the lawn, propped the camera on a biscuit tin, and snapped a few shots, trying to get the distorted reflections of the grass.
The only editing is cropping in Picasa.
-C. Appleby


I used a Canon XSi with a canon 18-55mm stock lens set at f/5.6, ISO 400, and exposure 1/200.
I liked the idea of having the drops explode on the center of the flower. It took lots and lots of pictures but I finally was able to get a drop in the middle with some character. I used photoshop to crop and sharpen the picture and to adjust the levels.
-Vanesa Medina

Advertisement


Shot using a Canon EOS 500D, a Flashgun and a Canon 70-300mm IS Lens, 1/60 ISO200 f4.6
Some of the examples you provided this week for Water Drops were fantastic, but didn't see why similar results couldn't be produced outdoors. This photo is of a Hose pipe slowly dripping onto a rusty drain cover. I love how some of the droplets could easily be mistaken for marbles.
-Charlie Davis

Advertisement


Canon EOS 1000D
50mm MKII f/1.8
ISO 200
Shutter Speed - 1/250
Aperture - F8
Tripod
Canon Speedlite 430EXII
This came from the first batch of water splash shots that I'd ever done!
-Tom Cooke


This shot was taken with a Canon EOS 7D and an EF100mm f/2.8 Macro USM. Aperture was set @ f/11. Shutter speed @ 1/250. Flash fired. I had a red tray filed with water and my dripper filed with greed food collaring.
-Jude Hall

Advertisement


I have a NikonD3000, and I shoot with the same lens and flash that came with the camera at purchase. The camera was set on the AUTO setting, so the Iso was automatically set on 400, shutter speed was on 1/60, and I had my camera set on continuous shots.
I was playing water balloons with my three year old cousin and little brother yesterday, when I took this. My little brother somehow untied the balloon, and then proceeded to dump it over my little cousins head.
-Marissa Gillman

Advertisement


Nikon D90
F5.6 - standard kit lens
1/500
I used the first of the two methods given as I only had the basic equipment. I hung a plastic bag filled with water over the wooden deck by the pool and let the drops fall. Simple.
Brightness and contrast adjustments in photoshop and done.
-Adam Norbury


In order to get this photo, I elevated a clear container and put a lamp under it. I also used a floor lamp, my ceiling light (both pointing down), and the built in flash of my Canon XS. Next I filled the container with milk (I found out 2% works better than whole). Then I dropped individual drops of food green, blue, and red coloring in. Over the course of 674 photos, the colors started to mix and I ended up with this shot. I used a 55mm focal length, an ISO of 400, an f-stop of 32 at 1/200 of a second.
-John Chapman

Advertisement


Equipment: Canon 5D Mark ii. Canon 100MM F2.8 Macro. Small tripod.
Settings: 1/4000th, Aperture likely 2.8 to 3.5 ISO equivalent 1600 (exif data not available at the time of submission so aperture and ISO are from memory), natural daylight.
Location: Thai restaurant in Notting Hill, London, over lunch with my business partner and her 4 year old daughter, the week our software product really came together. Time to reflect and smile. Made me think of this competition. Asked for an extra glass of water and captured what for me feels like the famous shot of the earth with the moon in the background. OK, banal, it's only a pastel color mostly out-of-focus picture from a restaurant but it captured the mood of the day.
-Frode Hegland

Advertisement


Shot with a Nikon D50 using a Nikkor 18-135mm lens @ 135mm (f/20, 1/250, ISO 200). I suspended some water in a bag over a bowl of pomegranate juice. I experimented with some off-camera speedlights, but this shot was taken with the on-board flash and ambient light. Cropped and sharpened in Photoshop.
-Ben Bassak


Milk drop
Canon 30D
Canon 100mm f/2.8 Macro
f/10 1/250th
Canon 430EX flash
-Chris Andrews

Advertisement


Camera: Nikon D90
Lens: AF-S Nikkor 35mm 1:1.8G
Flash: Yes, Built-in.
Shutter Speed: 1/200 sec
ISO: 6400
F-Stop: f/1.8
Focal Length: 35mm
Filters: Hoya HMC Super Thin 52mm Circular Polarizing + Hoya HMC Super 52mm UV[0]
Plate glass mirror lying flat with water dripping directly from the tap. Built-in flash (diverted with another mirror) and a handheld led flashlight from the side.
-Dani Pletter

Advertisement


Pentax K2000
Shutter Speed: 1/180 sec
Aperture: f/4.5
ISO: 400
Built-in Flash (forced)
I wanted to do something that was a bit more still life than a lone water drop. I filled a medicine syringe with tea and slowly pressed the plunger to force the liquid out in droplets (too fast, and it would just stream the tea). I used Lightroom and GIMP for slight color-correcting and sharpening.
-Katie Dahlquist


Camera: Olympus E-510
Lens: Zuiko 70-300mm F/4-5.6
Shutter Speed: 1/180 sec
ISO: 100
F-Stop: f/16
Focal Length: 300mm
Flash: camera only, full power
I used a clear glass bowl filled to the top with water and a Ziploc bag hanging from a floor lamp for dripping. The background is a piece of foil wrapping paper.
-Jeff Beining

Advertisement


(Like DJ KOOL) *Acha acha* Let Me Clear My Throat
Now When I say "Fish" you say "Suck"
"FISH!" - "SUCK!" "FISH!" - "SUCK!"
And when I say "B" You say "P"
"BEE!" -"PEE!" "BEE!" - "PEE!"
And if you love OIL Like I Love OIL
Say "Petroooleum!"
"PETROOOLEUM!"
Haay, HO, Haaay, HO, Haaay HO...
NIkon D300
18.0-200.0mm f3.5 Lens
1/60 sec at f5.6
200mm ISO 200
SB-800 flash 1/32
-Jason White

Advertisement


This shot was taken with a Canon 7D, and sadly enough a 18-55mm kit lens from my old Digital Rebel XT. The settings were 55mm, 1/250, and f/22. I used a small soy sauce bowl, tap water, and red dye. I started with just the tap water in the bowl. Using a syringe I dripped the dye into the water. I got some interesting shots, but this one looked the coolest. If you look in the droplet, you can see the red dye flowing to the top and bottom of it. It looks like there is an inverted mushroom cloud at the bottom. I actually spent a lot of time trying to get some good shots, over 400 photos were taken.
-Corey Tess


Story:
It took me a while to find an interesting scene for the drop but after a little deliberation I settled on flooding a black glass bowl that was being used to hold a bunch of pebbles. I wanted to play about with various light sources and after a bit of trial and error with various gels on the flash guns I settled on a 1/2 CTB bounced off the wall to give a soft blue effect and a 1/2 CTO shot from camera right to add a little warmth and a nice orange/yellow glow to the drops.
Only minor tweaks in Lightroom, upped the contrast and messed a little with the tone curve and added a bit of a vignette.
Hardware:
Nikon D700
Sigma 70mm f2.8 Macro
Nikon SB-900 with Honl 1/2 CTB
Nikon SB-800 with Honl 1/2 CTO, Heavy Frost and snoot
Plastic cup with a hole in the bottom
Settings:
ISO: 200
Aperture: f8
Shutter: 1/250
SB-900: 1/16
SB-800: 1/32
-Chris Gamblen

Advertisement


Shooting summary: Canon t1i, EF100mm f/2.8 Macro USM, ISO 100, f /3.2, 1/200, built in flash.
The camera was set up on a tripod in front of a public drinking fountain on the river promenade in Sacramento, CA. While firing the shutter remotely, my friend Vince held the drinking fountain on. The photo was enhanced and rotated in Aperture 3.
-Nick Ehrmann

Advertisement


Shot with a Canon 5D Mk II at 58mm 1/200 f22 ISO 200. I wanted to create something a bit surreal, so I placed a spiral notebook under a clear glass baking dish filled with 1/2 inch of water. It was illuminated with an off camera flash set at 1/4 power. I rested my right hand holding the pencil on the edge of the baking dish, whilst holding a plastic bag filled with water dripping precariously close to all the electronic equipment in my left hand. The camera was triggered by my right foot from a remote trigger laying on the ground. This was my first time trying to shoot a water drop and it took about 500 tries.
-Garry Kline


Shot with a Pentax K-x with DA L 18m-55m lens
f/8; 1/90s; ISO-800; 55mm focal length
I shot this photo using a clear Pyrex bowl with red and green food coloring in water filled to the top. I filled a Ziploc sandwich bag with water and red and blue food coloring and got to work. I ended up taking almost 300 shots with varying lighting conditions, backgrounds, flash settings, and water colors. The submitted shot was taken with the bowl and background in strong sunlight using a trailing curtain sync flash. There was minor touch-up work in Lightroom to balance the color and contrast, crop the image to get the desired composition, and apply a bit of sharpening to the RAW photo. Overall, I'm very happy with the results considering I didn't use a tripod and all of the shots were handheld. This was my first time trying anything like this (I just got my camera for Christmas) and it's my first submission to the shooting challenge.
-Jonathan Bishop

Advertisement


I used the second tutorial and used a white background and white plate with skim milk and food coloring. Also I used oral baby medicine syringes to make the drops. Equipment, Nikon D60, speedlight and cable mounted on tripod.
Settings: f/4, 1/200sec, iso 400
-Ashley Winder

Advertisement


Sony Alpha A230 18-55mm lens, 1/1000, f4.5, ISO 400
Dropping water out of a water bottle onto masonry on my front porch. Simply taking lots of shots of many drops of water. This was the most interesting one.
-David Lonkart


Camera: Canon EOS 40D
Lens: Canon EF100mm f/2.8 macro USM
Flash: Canon 430ex with wireless cactus trigger
Exposure: 100mm, 1/60sec, ISO 500 @ f/13
Setup a glass bowl of water infront of an orange plastic plate with Camera on a GorillaPod and flash sitting to the right of the camera (pointed at the orange plate). Set manual exposure to 1/60 @ f/13 and ISO 500 with lens set to manual focus and drive mode on multiple high speed shooting. Used a little turkey baster thingy to suck up water and then drop water from various heights while holding the shutter release in the other hand and firing off as many shots as possible. Played with some of the levels (blacks, contrast, clarity) in Lightroom.
I had a few shots that were close to perfect but were either out of the frame a bit or a little out of focus. I could have spent many hours on this challenge in search of that elusive "perfect drop", but I chose to keep my sanity instead. I'll have to give this another go sometime, but for now, this was the best shot of the bunch.
-Andrew O'Hoski

Advertisement


The flash on my D5000 was yeilding crappy results, so I decided to use natural daylight. 35mm, 1/2000, f5, ISO 2000
-Matthew Hill

Advertisement


Nikon D70 with Quantaray 28-92mm. 1/250 at f-10, ISO 400. 92mm focal length.
Set up a plastic cup with a pinhole poked in the bottom over a piece of Polish stoneware filled with water. Ran as many shots as I could with flash, this one turned out the best.
-Darryl Bishop


The equipment I used was a Nikon D80, Macro lens, Nikon SB800 Speedlight Flash and a tripod.
The technique I used was similar to the one used in the tutorial by Johnah Surkes.
I filled a large black bowl 3/4 full with water. Taped blue construction paper behind it to enhance the water colour.
My camera was about 5 inches higher than the bowl pointing on a downward angle. I used ISO 200, f/22 with a 1 second exposure. I found by setting my exposure to bulb and triggering it manually I was able to properly sync with my flash which I was also triggering manually. I pointed the flash at the construction paper.
I tied a ziplock back with water to my cupboard handle, made a pinhole and let the water drop.
I used photoshop to paint out the dust specs that were in the water, since I forgot to wipe the bowl before using it. I also added a vignette to hide the edge of the bowl.
It was my first time using water for photography and it inspired other attempts, I tried with a shiny green paper, added milk drops to the water etc.
But I liked the serenity of this image.
-Bonnie Dickson

Advertisement


this image was shot on a Nikon D60 set at 1/640, f.5, ISO 125, in 16bit raw (NEF) with center weighted metering. for a lens i used a 55-200 afs dx nikkor 4-5.6. for light i used a 500w umbrella and a 250w key light. for the water i used food coloring for my color and a homemade rig to achieve a consistent drip in to 4" of water in a bowl wrapped in crinkled tin-foil.
-Nelson Marsh

Advertisement


Out of almost 300 pictures, this was my favorite. If you look close, you can see the U.S. Flag reflected in the top, round drop. I got really lucky with this one!!!
My set up was a small clear dish with plain old tap water and one of those baby nasal aspirators full of water, hand-held about a foot from the dish, to make the drops.
Taken with a Panasonic Lumix on macro mode with flash burst frame mode. ISO 400 F/4.1
-Shahna Monge


Canon 40D + Tamron 18-250mm @ F8, 1/250s.
I made a tiny hole in a bottle, which was hanging over a container with water. Also, I used the built-in flash and a couple of color lamps.
-Oleksandr Ostrynskyy

Advertisement


Lumix DMC-GH1
Sigma 24mm f/1.8 EX DG Macro
ISO 100
1/160 Shutter
Nikon Speedlight SB-25 Flash
When approaching this shooting challenge, I went around to the various water sources around the places in my life and captured the impacts of the drops they created. However, I realized that I actually found the water in flight to be much more interesting than the impact itself. While this might not fit the exact criteria of the contest, I believe it is in keeping with the spirit of the challenge, and the method I used was a similar photographic method. I got as close as I could with my 24mm close-focusing lens, and grabbed this shot of water flying out of a drinking fountain. I found I could control the shape of the water and make interesting things happen depending on how I pulsed the push-bar of the fountain. This was my favorite one. I wanted to explore the perfection of the water in the moments before impact, rather than just doing another impact. I also wanted to show how the water forms shapes thanks to "impact" with air, and the sudden yet brief force of the open valve. Again, this might not be exactly what you're looking for, but I hope you'll include it.
-Benjamin Bunch

Advertisement


Canon SX200 IS
5mm
f/3.4
1/500
ISO 80
My first Shooting Challenge submission. My friend Nomi and I shot this while making baked goods for Mothers' Day. We used food coloring to make purple water and an eye dropper. We shot this and a few others with my Canon SX200IS for testing and then about 400 shots with a Nikon D70, but this was the best shot.
-Louie Livon-Bemel


These pics where taken with my Canon EOS rebel XS, in a day light with a 1cent coin and a steel container with water.
-Jay Sadaram

Advertisement


EOS 7D
ISO 6400
1/3200sec
Tamron 28-200 @ 200mm
f/16.0
Held a garden hose and remote shutter in one hand, sprayed the water into my left while I let the camera rip at 8fps. Its kinda noisy close up, but I had to amp up the ISO to get the fast shutter speed and high aperture. After some minor tweaks in Lightroom, I think it turned out pretty decent.
-Michael Salisbury

Advertisement


Pentax K-x, kit lens
F5.6
1/180
ISO 200
-0.3 ev
55 mm
"action" setting
built-in camera flash only
container: orange in color, Rachel Ray brand 1-qt oblong stoneware.
These have large oval holes on the ends to use as handles...explaining the patterns.
Water was very shallow and colored blue with food coloring.
Re-sized in PE6, but no other touchups.
I also got some bizarre, fun results using milk in the blue water...almost flourescent-looking with the flash.
-Mellanie Fuller


Shot with a Canon 7D with a EF 28-135mm USM Lens (1/400 sec, f/20, ISO 100). Also used a generic flash unit in a hot shoe adapter off camera-left.
I figured I'd put my new 7D to the test by entering in my first shooting challenge! I filled a simple black bowl from IKEA with water, I hung some blue fabric and taped up some yellow, orange and red construction paper just out of frame. Then I rigged a bottle with a straw at the end to a tripod and placed it right over the center of the bowl. It still took a while to get the timing just right...but at the 241st picture, I got this.
-Michael Zvonar

Advertisement


Camera: Nikon D3000
Lens: AF-S Nikkor 18-55mm
ISO: 200
Focal Length: 22mm
Aperture: F/4
Shutter Speed: 1/1600
Manual Focus
Metering: Matrix
This shot is using a stone spoon holder that my grandfather made and while I snapped the shots my brother Jeremiah dropped the water into a small puddle in the middle of the stone. This image has been cropped to show a closer picture. No other touch-up work has been done.
-Bryan Dutcher

Advertisement


Crown of Wine
Panasonic Lumix TZ-7.
Shot taken with autofocus Lock on, side lighting with an LED torch and the built in flash.
My other pics were all really clear "drop" pictures but this with the height of the camera in this shot, the water gave such a reflection that it turned white.
Hung a plastic bag with a pin hole and wine above the glass, watch the drops fall and snapped the pics.
-Nils Rohwer


Camera: Canon 300D
Lens: Canon 50mm f/1.8
ISO: 100
Aperture: f/4.5
Exposure: 1/1600 sec
This is actually my first dSLR - I had just gotten the camera second hand from trademe (the New Zealand equivalent of eBay).I was pretty excited to start shooting some pictures, so after church I decided to take some pictures of my little buddy Stefan in the playground. Just my luck that there was a water fountain in the playground - it was not till later, while going through the pictures on the computer, that I thought about submitting it for this week's shooting challenge. Hope you like it; if not, please do tell me how I can improve my technique
-Jonathan Ng

Advertisement


A drop of water landing in a shallow tray on top of a harddrive logic board.
(The SCSI drive that donated the circuits was already dead, no technology
suffered due to the taking of this picture)
Canon EOS 450D, EF100mm Macro USM f/2.8 at f/10, builtin flash, with x-sync at
1/200s. Tripod.
-Staffan Thomen

Advertisement


Nikon D700
Tamron 90mm Macro
ISO 800
f 16
1/5000s
Lighting: full sun
Filled a tall glass coffee pot with distilled water and shot away
while water dripped down from above. With the macro lens, the short
depth of field was a problem, but after many many shots, got a few
that came out sharp in key areas. This was the best of the lot.
Lighting was a challenge, since the shutter speed needed to be fast,
when the sun went behind some clouds for a few minutes, none of the
pictures came out well.
-Richard Roberts


Canon Eos 500D with Tamron 70-300mm lens @ 180mm also used tripod and remote trigger and a very big drop dropped from ca. 1m height.
Iso 640; 1/ 2000 sec; f/4.5; Sunlight / no flash.
-Roland Renne

Advertisement


Camera: Sony HX-1
Shutter Speed: 1/320
Aperture: f/4
ISO: 200
Took the pic through beaming light from windows. Needed a lot patience and effort.
-Jude Raj

Advertisement


Gothenburg/Sweden.
Camer: Nikon D40 + kit lens and the popup flash
ExposureTime : 1/250Sec
FNumber : F5,3
ExposureProgram : Shutter Priority
ISOSpeedRatings : 200
WhiteBalance : Auto
FocalLength : 45,00(mm)
-Alexander Garcia


the tehnique is simple :)
we have one drop that falls in water and rebounds and the second is coming down hitting the first. you have a link with a little example. http://www.flickr.com/photos/33427307@N05/4575661194/
nikon d90 at 2 second with f:16, 2 external metz flash connected to a device that control the timing . so the flash will frozen the moment.
-Silviu Bondari

Advertisement


This photo was taken in my kitchen sink. The faucet was my source for water dripping into a tall glass. Used photoshop to crop image.
Nikon D3000
Stock Nikkor AF-S 18-55mm Lens with Raynox DCR-250 Macro Lens attached
Focal length- 55mm
Fstop- F13
ISO- 100
Shutter- 1/200
Flash compensation- +1.0
-Anthony Saunders

Advertisement


This was taken in the backyard of my house. Natural sunlight. Dropping water from a straw into a dessert bowl.
Hardest part was timing the shot. One hand on the camera and the other one the straw ready to release the water.
And I thought this challenge would be a cakewalk !!! Not so easy !!!
Shot using a Canon EOS Rebel T2i. EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS lens at 25mm focal length. Manual focus. No flash.
Aperture priority mode. Shot at 1/250 sec at f11. ISO 400. Captured using the continuous shot mode.
-John McNamara


Canon 5D Mrk II f/22 B (cable trigger)
Canon 180mm macro
580EX II ext flash
430EX ext flash
MT-24EX twin flash
Home-brew, PIC microcontroller laser/photocell trigger
all flashes set to 1/64th power for shortest flash duration
with laser trigger beam ~2.5" above drop, 30-200ms trigger
delays used for various different shots
-Randy Heisch

Advertisement


I don't know how this one turned out the way it did, but I think it's pretty cool looking. Looks like a dog swimming to me.
Here's what I used:
Olympus E-510 with a 25mm pancake lens f2.8 1/50 shutter speed and an ISO of 100. I ended up rigging something up in my shower with a bag, a chopstick, a needle and my shower hooks.
-Curran Craig

Advertisement


Clown Vomit
I tried a bunch of liquids, then my daughter suggested we mix them all together.
Pomegranate syrup + mustard + vinaigrette mixture dropped into water in a Pyrex pan over white paper.
Canon 7D, 100mm lens. f/9, 1/2000 sec, ISO-3200, LED spotlight
- David Lee


For this image, I set a blue plastic bag on the table, and hung a plastic bag filled with water from a tripod. I used a Canon Digital Rebel XT, Canon 24-105 L lens set to 105 mm, f/16, ISO 200. I used a flash and default shutter speed of 1/200s.
-Joe Russo

Advertisement


I got this shot on my kitchen counter, with a wine glass upside down and the base of it filled with water. I then used a turkey baster to drop water in and catch it mid-splash. A sheet of black construction paper was used in the background, and the orange colors you see in the reflections are from the granite counter top I was working on.
Shot on a tripod with a Canon Rebel XT and a 28-135mm lens which does pretty good macro. Used a 430EX flash on a sync cord to provide ample light once I cranked down the aperture (f/18) to get deep depth of field. ISO 800, 1/200th of a second.
- Eric Gaertner

Advertisement


I used a canon G9 along with the MAKE Controller. I shot in the
dark in my garage and left the shutter open. I used the
microphone attachment to the controller to set the flash off. I
poked a water balloon with a pencil and was able to capture it mid
pop.
-Morgan K Eberley


Shot outdoors, natural sunlight, on my wife's massage table with my Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III, 85mm f/1.8 Lens, 100 ISO, 1/1000 second @ f/4.5, Rapid Fire
-Dale Boswell

Advertisement


The shot is of a drop of milk splashing onto a black polythene sheet stretched across a table. A camera mounted flash bounced light off polystyrene boards that were set up just out of shot on the left and rear of the frame (no other light was used). iPhoto and Photoshop were used to grade, crop and slightly sharpen.
Canon 500D / Tamron 17-50mm f/2.8 / Canon Speedlite 430 EXII
Shot at:
50mm
f/13
ISO 200
1/10 sec exposure
Flash at 1/64 intensity
-Peter Amies

Advertisement


Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark II
Lens: EF 24-70mm f2.8L USM
ISO: 200
Exposure: 1/200 @ f/10
Flash: Speedlite 430 EX
My morning coffee has it's bitter edge taken off it with a splash of milk. The marble like texture showing the fusion of the light into the dark liquid.
-Shanon Moratti


I shot this with a Canon Rebel T1i with a 100MM canon macro lens at f/13 iso 200. I triggered 2 flashes to fire after a delay when the water drop breaks a beam, using a custom controller I built for doing long exposure astrophotography called chonocam. What you see is 2 drops colliding. The first drop creates a little up splash and if you time your second drop PERFECTLY they will impact each other and viola. I added some red food coloring to the drops for contrast. The pool is just a Pyrex dish with some black garbage bag plastic for lining.
I had a few more pretty nice ones but was told you prefer only 1 entry.
-Jesse Hayes

Advertisement


I'm a total noob, but I've been enjoying the other challenges and wanted to jump in and give this one a shot.
For technique, I followed the example pretty closely. I took an antique oriental bowl from my parents' living room, took it out on the deck and positioned a leaky hose over it using the back of a chair.
Camera: CD Mavica MVC-CD400
Lens: f = 7.0 - 21.0 mm
ISO: Auto
Shutter speed: 1/1000s
-Philip Levy

Advertisement


I thought this would be a good way to break in my new Canon 7D and teach myself about macro photography.
The equipment I used was a Canon 7D with a Canon EF-S 60mm f/2.8 Macro lens and a Canon Speedlite 580EX II. I experimented with all kinds of settings, but this picture was taken with at f-32, ISO 400 and a shutter speed of 1/250.
I shot this in my dining room. I used a clamp-on spotlight I picked up at Home Depot, clamped to the back of a chair. I used blue construction paper for the background. I had an old absinthe fountain lying around, so I used that for the water drops.
-Jay Brennan


Camera: Canon EOS 7D
Lens: Canon 100mm 2.8 Macro
ISO: 100
Shutter speed 1/40
Aperture: 14
I would've preferred the reds to be a bit less pink, but I'm still happy with the end result.
What you're looking at is a water drop colliding with the splash caused by the previous water drop. This rarely happens, so I felt quite lucky after seeing the preview image on the camera's LCD.
-Terry Seidler

Advertisement


Photo was taken using lights above stove top positioned behind me (creating front light on bowl used) and on-camera flash deflected by regular printer paper. Filled a zip lock baggie and poked a hole, then held it over the bowl with help from girlfriend. Used kit lens plus Hoya close-up filter (+4) to simulate macro lens. User a red towel to try and change background color. Image was cropped and wb changed to tungsten in Lightroom. See EXIF below:
Canon Rebel XSI w/ EF-S 18-55mm kit lens + close up filter (+4)
Exposure: 1/20 sec at f/5.6
Focal Length: 55 mm
ISO 200
Flash fired
-Saer Goree-Ndiaye

Advertisement


A few glasses collecting water in the sink.
Canon Rebel XSi, 18-55 mm, f/5.6, 400 ISO, 1/200 Exposure with flash.
-Stephen Galpin


My Kitchen Faucet leaks... So I used it for the Source of the Drops...
I placed a Black Dinner Plate under the Faucet... waited till it filled with water and 200 or so shots later I got 2 that I thought were Winners.
They were shot with a Canon T1I, with a Tokina 100mm Macro F2.8 D
Flash On
Tv = 1/60
Av = F4
ISO = 100
Image I = 4704px X 2418px ~ Image II = 3741px X 2418px
Color = AdobeRGB
-Charles Carroll

Advertisement


My water droplet picture taken with a Canon XT1i. It took a lot of patience.
-Sally Reece

Advertisement


Coffee and cream
Nikon D40
lens 18mm - 55mm
1/500 s
f/4.5
ISO 800
I used a medicine dropper of half and half and held it about about 18 inches above the cup.
I used a remote to trigger the camera just as the cream left the dropper.
This is one of the first shots I took, I sort of lucked out on the timing.
-Tim Post


Shot with a Nikon D40, Nikkor AF-S 18-55mm lens at 55mm on aperture priority using built-in flash.
Shutter: 1/60
Aperture: f/5.6
ISO: 200
I simply filled a bluish bowl with water and grenadine (for the red color), set it under the faucet on a slow, rhythmic drip, and clicked away. I draped a black t-shirt behind the bowl for a backdrop.
-Buddy Mitchell

Advertisement


Camera: Nikon D80
Iso: 800
Shutter Speed: 1/1250
Aperture: f/16
Lens: 18-135mm
My set up is a white cloth in the background with a flood light and a clay pot with water. I added sugar to slow the water down a bit and instead of a plastic bag for my water dropper I used a syringe to drop the water.
-Ateev Gupta