Hello there, I"m excited to make my first photo contest submission:

I hiked up to a high point in Griffith Park, Los Angeles, to where I could watch people as they looked out at the sunset over the observatory. From where the people in my photo are standing, they can see down to West Hollywood and the Sunset Strip and all the way to the beach. I shot with a Canon 5D on a tripod and used f/22 to allow everything to be in focus. I used ISO 1600 with a 24-70mm lens, open all the way to 24mm, and aperture priority chose 1/3200 for the shutter. I set the exposure to be slightly under, and I bracketed 1.33 stops in either direction. I wasn't really thinking about the ISO speed—if I did it again I'd probably go slower.
Interesting snippets of conversation from the sunset gazers—some tourists in awe of the fact that LA actually has a park like this, and then some Angelenos talking about water rights, water adjudication, and water wars. This location is awesome, because on a clear day you can see the mountains to the northeast (which are covered in snow right now), and you can see downtown LA to the south, you can see all the things I mentioned earlier, and you are above the entire sprawling metropolis.

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Looking forward to seeing what the other Gizmodo shutterbugs come up with!

Thanks,
-Adam Thurtell

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Equipment used was a Canon 5D Mark II and a Canon EF 16-35mm f2.8L lens. ISO was set at 1600 and aperture at f/11. In the photo, clouds covered the sky and light misting was prevalent. I wanted to utilize the weather conditions to take this shot of art sculpture, Blueprints, at Addison Circle in Addison, TX. Most pictures of the Blueprints art sculpture in are taken with plenty of sunlight or at night but I wanted to shoot the sculpture under a different setting with a perspective of walking down the ramp heading towards the circle. A couple interesting facts about the sculpture is that it required 650 gallons of paint to cover the steel structure and cost a bit over $2 million.

Regards,
-Alex Stevenson

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This is a capture of the Little Lake outlook along the I-395 in the eastern Sierra Nevada. I've driven all throughout the Sierra Nevada for most of my life but I had never thought to stop to admire the volcanic sands at Little Lake before. As I drove past I noticed the towering mounds of pumic piled to my left and was instantly reminded of the charred red exterior of a Martian landscape and I knew I had to capture my vision. When I arrived at the lakes I was stricken by the drastic curves their shorelines created as if the body of water was alive and moving. So, I searched for a bit and was able to incorporate the snaking lake into my idea of an earthen alternative to a Martian landscape and I came out extremely please with my capture.

Nikon D3000 + Tamron 10-24 w/ Galen Rowell GND + Cokin Warming Filter
f/22
1/40 sec.
ISO 200

-Andre Mere

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It seems that every time I use hyperfocal calculations it is for pictures of cars. For this assignment, I fell back into old habits. I wanted to highlight the joy of winter driving. The vertical composition let me feature the tires, the car and the road. This shot was made on a Canon 5D mkII, with a Canon 16-35mm f/2.8L at 16mm. The settings were ISO 200, 1/30th, f/22.
- Andrew Payne

Hi Giz,
Sorry, my smaller photo is a tad bigger than your maximum but I haven't worked out how to reduce the file size without destroying the photo's quality, killing it's wife and spitting on the grave of it's great great great grandfather's first cousin twice removed. I hope you'll still accept this entry!
The shot was taken with a 2 legs of my tripod thrust out the bedroom window of my flat in Hong Kong. I cunningly placed my lazy fatass cat on the other leg to hold it down, leaving me both hands to adjust the camera and frame my shot. I decided that an image like this would look best wide, but I thanks to my 500D's crop factor and the fact that my other lenses weren't available, I couldn't get all the details of the buildings in one landscape shot. Instead, I shot 3 shots in portrait on ISO 200, focal length 18, for 1/16th of a second with an aperture of 13.5. When I had all the shots, I used Photoshop's automated photo stitching, then cropped to get this image. This gave me the shot content I wanted, but had the adverse effect of distorting the buildings to my left. I haven't worked out how to fix that yet. All photos have also been sharpened and had colours adjusted for mood.
- David (Andy) Knight (罗安祖)

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The Deep

Nikon D300s - AF - Nikkor - 50mm - F/2.5 - ISO 250 - 1/160sec.

Taken along the banks of the Dubai Creek, this picture has showed me so many new colors in such a new perspective and especially it being a hyperfocal image made it look even more "DEEP".
-Arsh Sayed

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I took this photo at the UC Davis airport. I sat with my camera on my bag with the shot composed and my lens set to the proper hyperfocal focus position and waited for a plane to take off. It took a few planes to get one in the right position. Thanks to Peter Hess for his help with the post work on this photo. I believe this was taken at an aperture of f/16 or f/22...not sure because the manual lens doesn't save EXIF data.

Camera: Panasonic Lumix GH2
Lens: Sigma 24mm f/1.8 EX DG Asph Macro (cropped to 48mm equiv.)
Post in Adobe Lightroom
- Benjamin Bunch

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Hello,
I was just turned on to this contest yesterday and had to submit. I am a graphic artist by trade and always think layout when I take my photos. I had 3 photos which I was considering to submit but this image stood out to my associates and I the most. All though the other images had great stories this one was rather simple. I saw a bee on the screen of my home as I glanced at my children playing in the front. I thought......This is the closest I will be able to get to a bee minus being stung by one. I grabbed my camera by my bed and snapped away. This photo is one of the moments outcomes.
-Ben Mendoza

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Summary:

- Body: Canon 7D
- Lens: Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-f/4.5 USM
- ISO: 200
- Focal: 17mm
- Aperture: f/8
- Shutter: 1 second

Background:

Santa Cruz quickly becoming my favorite area for seascapes and sunsets. It seems like there are so many different beaches and each one has a number of possibilities. I decided to visit Panther Beach for the first time since Natural Bridges is overloaded with people. The descent down to the beach had me worried a little since it's more or less just a steep hill without stairs, but the moment that I got down there I knew I would have to come back. There are so many interesting rock formations here and so little time to explore since I arrived much later than I had anticipated. Settling on the first possible composition, I setup my tripod in a hurry and shot like a happy madman for an hour. I wish there were more clouds though.
-Bobby Yang

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Taken with a Canon powershot S90. 1/20 second exposure at f/8.0, ISO 100.

This is a picture of the "Motherhood" statue at Percival Landing in Olympia, WA. Foreground wood provides texture and focus, because the sky was totally featureless.
-Brian C. Hall

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This was taken in Gloucester, MA, the day after the Nor'easter we had a couple of days ago...

This is the Foot Bridge, which is one of 2 access points to the beach.

The photo was taken around 11 am., with a Panasonic Lumix DMC-ZS5. The Exposure was F/4 @ 1/125 sec.

The ISO, was set to 100 and the WB was set to Auto.
-Charlie Carroll

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Nikon D5000
Nikkor 18-70mm lens
ISO 400
Focal Length 50 mm
Aperture F/11
Shutter Speed 1/500

A perfect South Florida afternoon in December. It felt like a tropical paradise until you see the one lonely light post reminding us of civilization.
-Chris Piedra

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This was shot with a NEX-VG10 with a SEL 18200 lens. The stutter was at 1/320 with an F-stop of 5.6 and an ISO of 800.

I was in downtown Dallas with my buddies just trying to find something to skate on a rainy day. There wasn't much skating going on on account of the misty rain... And the cops. So while we were on our way to the next covered skate spot we went though this parking lot and i was carrying my camera in my right hand and i forgot to turn it off. I guess while i was walking through that parking lot i took the picture accidentally. I figured that is what had happened because while i am holding the camera by the handle i always accidently hit the photo button. I already knew i was going to enter this contest and i had taken a few picture (on purpose) for it, but while i was going through them i decided on this one because it was just so crazy that i took this picture without even knowing it.
-Dan Jarvis

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Canon T2i, 50mm lens, ISO 800, 18mm, 0EV, f/10, 1/2000

This is the old lighthouse in Scituate Harbor, MA.

Thanks to this challenge I discovered my camera's DOF preview button on the front, and learned some important lessons re: aperture and lighting conditions. Thanks Gizmodo! I am not sure how much of this technique I'll be using in the future (Having to calculate the HFD on the spot is hard, since many times the shot is unpredictable), but in this case it was a great learning experience. It actually worked!
- Diego Jiménez

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I've always enjoyed this view. Since you have to turn away from the landmark people come to see I wonder how many people take the time to appreciate this particular perspective. I like using one lens, often a prime for each "shooting adventure" I take, forcing myself to find great photos without relying on a variety of gear. I am often surprised at the variability and creativity one can have with say, a 50mm lens. I used my Canon 7D with a 50mm prime to get this shot. Exposure time 1/1000 and f-stop 11.
-Eryn Duffee-Braun

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Canon Rebel XS
Kit Lens at 34mm
f/25
ISO 200
1/50 shutter speed

I was visiting my grandmother and noticed the dam by her house was frozen with water still running. I trekked out a ways, not realizing the ice wasn't very thick. While taking this shot, the ice broke, almost sending me and my camera into the water. Luckily I was able to grab onto a tree branch.
- Evan T. Gruenes

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Metadata for the attached photo:
Camera: Nikon D300s
Lens: Nikkor 18-200 DX 3.5-5.6 GII ED
Focal length: 56mm
Aperture: F18
Speed: 30 seconds
Metering: spot metering
White balance: white fluorescent
Hyperfocal distance approx. 27 feet near and far = infinity

This shot was taken at 6:33pm near the Hogs Back falls in Ottawa, Ontario on a wintery saturday evening. On this particular evening the snow was tapering off at the time the shot was taken and the weather was about -6 celsius, a perfect night for taking the falls. The falls look kind of eerie as the snow was still falling a bit and nightfall was upon us. However the site of the falls being in the city, the reflected light from city streets had be try out different white balance settings until the one that seemed the most appropriate was chosen which was white fluorescent. The image was converted to black and white as it seemed to have more impact.
-Gerard Mathieu

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This photo was shot using a Nikon D70s with a 50mm f/1.8 Nikkor lens. The aperture was set at f/14, the ISO at 250 and shutter speed at .5s.

I took this picture after realizing how nice the sky was lighting up on my way home from work. Living a few blocks away from the Capitol Building, I hurried down after I grabbed my camera and tripod and took some photos.
- James McMahon

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The golden ibex

There is a legend aboud an ibex with golden horns, a story about love, greed and courage. From his blood grew the prettiest flowers ever seen. In order to marry a beautiful girl a hunter decided to kill the golden ibex. The ibex was hurt but he killed the hunter and it took a year before the rivers washed his body into the valley. A hunter was still holding the flowers in his hand. The ibex left the mountains and was never seen again. However an ordinary ibex still lives in our mountains and the ibex with golden horns is now a symbol and a legend.

Equipment: Nikon D5000, AF-S 18-105
Settings: 18mm, ISO 400, f/8, 157 sec. Focus set at around 3 meters.
Location: Kranjska gora, Slovenia
-Janez Kos

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Hello!
A friend of mine passed on your photo challenge on hyperfocal and it sounded like fun. I wanted to do something but it was late at night and I won't have much time this week so I setup some fruit on our dining room table, broke out my fish eye lens and came up with the attached image. Using the fisheye allowed me to get right up on the banana and there was just barely enough light in our dining room to allow me to use a very small aperture for the greatest depth of field. Fun stuff. I would have liked to have done more but...
Thanks for the challenge. It was fun to think about a shot and concept before picking up my camera.
Nikon D90, 10.5mm lens, ISO 320, f/22, 0.8s shutter.
- Jason Halladay

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Gear & settings:
Canon t1i, f/18, exposure 30sec, focal length 18mm, iso 100

A friend of mine just moved into this apartment down the street from the American Airlines Arena in Miami. He told me there was an awesome view & I couldn't wait go take some pics. I had the challenge in mind & thought I could actually get better pics in the day time with perhaps some interstesting things in the foreground. I didn't get to go back in the daytime (before the Giz deadline) so I went to a park & took some other pics but I didn't feel they were up to par. Once I started going through all my pics I was happy to find this one meets the criteria of the challenge. The buildings in the foreground & background are all in focus with the added coolness of the streaking car lights. The best thing about this pic is a hidden gem that I didn't even see until I put it on my monitor, there's a cool airplain trail that kinda snakes right about the arena.
flickr
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jajajavi75/5363153782/
- Javier Valencia

Nikon D7000
18-105mm lens at 40mm
ISO 100
aperture f/13
exposure 1/30
white balance cloudy
shot jpg basic straight from camera - resized in Photoshop CS3 Extended

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I love shooting the many old oil country train trestles here in Warren, PA - they offer great contrast (especially now in winter), perspective and detail. I used a tripod and remote for most of my attempts for this challenge, but I ended up taking this shot handheld. I used a handy DOF calculator app because, really, who wants to stand around in 16 degree river wind doing algebra? Kinda takes the fun out of the photography. The bolts/rivets at the extreme left edge of the frame are about 8 feet from me, the far end of the bridge is around 1,000 feet from me, the houses on the other side of the river nearly half a mile.
- Jeremy Jeziorski

This image was taken with my Canon Rebel xt and a 50mm lens. I shot this in Jim Thorpe, PA. I love going there. It is a cute little town with old vintage shops. You can always get great architectural shots. This was taken of an old church. I took it close up at an angle to get depth and detail.
-Jessica Krzywicki

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Electricity

Nikon D70s on tripod with 18-70mm lens set to 70.
ISO 200, f29 @ 1/13 sec

The batteries were about 1.5 m away, the power generator plant 700 m, the distant hill about 3.5 km.

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I wanted to frame the three towers of the generator plant into the image fairly tight and have three batteries in the foreground as big as possible. This resulted in using the lens at 70mm. Not ideal for pushing hyper-focal distance, but I like a challenge. The tiniest aperture on the lens was f29. No depth of field scale. So I started with the batteries about 3 meters away and focused on the stacks and batteries and then setting the focus in the middle and looking at the results on the camera by zooming in. I kept going closer to make the batteries bigger. The image I choose to submit when viewed on my PC at 100% both the towers and batteries were a little soft, but when reduced to 800 pixels they were close to next one. The charts I found suggested I would need to be 3.5m from the batteries, they were way too small at that distance.

It was still not quite what I wanted so I also took a bunch of images to merge together with focus stacking.

The Courtenay Bay Generating Station now decommissioned for a couple years, went online in 1960.

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PS. f29 is really bad(good) at showing how much dust I have on my sensor. I removed this in Photoshop.
- Jim Watters

This was shot with a handheld Canon Rebel XSi with an 18-55mm lens ISO 400 1/25 f18 shot in full Manual.

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This is my initial entrance to the Gizmodo challenge. I'm doing the 365 project this year and in order to keep things interesting there are a few challenges per week that I'm doing. This is the fence that encloses the Mercer Oak on the Princeton Battlefield in Princeton, NJ. I always thought that the battlefield was an interesting place to shoot. This was my first time there. I had a much different picture in my head while driving to the area, but when I got there I had to improvise because the sun was quickly setting in an area that I didn't think it would. I ran throught the calf high snow to the fence just as the sun was going below the tree line without having prior set up my shot. I think it turned out pretty well though! Enjoy!
- Jonathan Britt

The past week has seen some beautiful sunsets here in San Diego. The OB pier is a great spot for these shots.
Canon EOS 5D, Tamron 28-75 f/2.8 lens @ 28mm f/22 2.5sec exposure. Tripod mounted. Some color correction in PS.
- Joseph Baltazar

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Canon Powershot sx110is

1/1600 sec
ISO 80
f/3.5

To be honest I'm still not sure what hyperfocal is. I took guess and tried my hand at it. Camera doesn't take pictures with much depth so this is a stitched photo comprised of about 20 or so individual photos. The tree itself is located around a former army housing. Bit of a walk so had to have my mom drive me. I liked the way it turned out. Edited with windows live photo gallery (for those of us who don't have photoshop or GIMP)
- Kalden Dhatsenpa

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I took this shot with a Panasonic G2 using the 14-45mm lens that was stock with the G1.
Aperture F22, shutter 1/100, ISO400 and f=45mm.

I was out for a Sunday morning stroll in Skerries, Dublin, Ireland with my camera toting pals taking shots of the windmills there. The windmills aren't active any more but they had excellent green energy credentials - apart from the windmills there is also a water wheel on the site! When I saw the lighthouse on Rockabill Island 6 kilometres off shore, I remembered the photo challenge for this week.
I set up my tripod so that I was 3 metres from one windmill - that's the stone wall on the left side of the frame. The second windmill is 200m away and the lighthouse is between the two, 6km distant over the roofs of the houses between me and the coast. I would to get out to the lighthouse however the island is an important bird breeding ground guarded by two zealous keepers!
- Keith Boland

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I recently purchased my first DSLR just before Christmas. In order to learn how to use it better and learn more about photography I decided to do a photo a day project for the year, located at http://blog.kgtech.org/. I decide to start trying to do the Gizmodo challenges, starting with this one, and combined this days picture with the challenge. I took this on the side of the road on the way to my parents. As I was heading there I was looking for a good opportunity to take a picture. When I found them I hopped out of my car and snapped some shots. We live in cold Wisconsin and there are lots of farms and fields near my parents, like the one where I took this. The tree is in the middle of a corn field by itself. I was using my Canon XSi January 16, 2011, 1:58 pm. (55mm, 1/1600 @ Ć’/5.6, ISO 200) to take the picture.
-Kenny Gregory

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Canon EOS 7D
EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM
ISO 400
16mm focal length
f/22 aperture
1.6 second exposure

Planning to catch the sunset over Manhattan, I shuffled out into the cold toward a local pier, at the end of which is a bizarre sculpture–bench. The sun I'd hoped for was hidden by a haze of clouds, and the diffused light became dimmer and dimmer as I set up my camera. I didn't get the shot I was looking for, but overall, I like the chilly, brooding feeling evoked by the mistake.
- Kyle Jones

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Hey Hey.

A kinda sorta long exposure (14 minutes is kind of short by my standards, I'm usually doing them in the 1-2 hour range. . .) shot maybe 20 minutes before sunrise. What you can't see are the sub-freezing temperatures and the 20 MPH winds blowing nearly frozen salt spray into the air.

Shot on a Nikon D700 with a 16-35 f/4 VRII. 14 minutes @ ISO 200 f/4.
- Luke Bhothipiti

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Family and friends went hicking for the weekend in La Rumorosa Baja California Mexico, so i take the opportunity to try something for the challenge. In the photo is my brother-in-law and his to kids at the beggining of the trip, I used a Pentax K-x with the kit lens (18-55m) with an 800 iso at f/22 and 1/60 sec. It was an funny trip and the place is really beautiful.
-Manuel Velasco

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Canon EOS Rebel XS
50mm macro
f/5, ISO200, 1/1600

This challenge was a bit tougher for me, being a novice at all these photography tricks and all. But I found the hardest part of this just being finding a good scenic thing to shoot. I saw this park near home, with a frozen pond, but noticed a little piece of it that had a good light shine to it. After a couple of shots (and some lucky ducks swimming in), think I found something that worked.
- Marty Perez

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Ok so briefly I have very recently discovered the Sepulveda Basin Wild Life Reserve. I took this picture on my 3rd visit to this location on this last Sunday January 9th, 2011. I used a Minolta 100mm/300mm lens with a partial diffuser filter on a Sony A700. I have been trying to capture different wildlife images using a depth of field process when these two ducks came swimming by and the female came into focus right as I adjusted the camera to action mode for a more still image. I feel that with this photo I was lucky to have been in the right place at the right time. So no matter the out come please let me know your thoughts on this image.

Thank you,
- Nick Othello

Camera: Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX5

Settings:
Shutter Speed: 1/100s
Focal Length: 5.1mm
Aperture: f/2.8
ISO: 125

Story:
I have developed passion for photography ever since I bought my first DSLR (Canon 450D) in late 2008. At that time it was just a gadget for me to capture special days like holidays etc. I never would have thought that the camera would so quickly grow on me. It all started while reading its manual, when I realised photography is lot more than I could have ever imagined. Manual was just the beginning, then came books, blogs, various different techniques, equipment, Charlie Waite's documentaries, lenses, accessories, more equipment and the list is never ending. Soon I reached a point where I had gathered a bit of knowledge about photography but I still had no idea as to what to do with my photos. So in last November I created a page on Facebook with my dear friend with similar passion towards photography. On this page we will try to upload one photo per day for the rest of the year. Although its a bit difficult to do this everyday with the busy lives we all live. The photo I am entering today is of my day 42, which I took on my afternoon walk during lunch time. I am a software developer by profession. I personally feel that my photos have improved with time but they are still far from amazing. I will be glad if you can accept my entry for this challenge.

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Kind Regards,
Parul Kundra

I had always trouble to get all my music instruments in focus when taking close pictures. After some practice and reading, I managed to control this type of shots, which give excellent results with natural light. This picture shows a new violin bridge installed over an old violin from early XIX century. The instrument does not excells in performance and it is not in perfect state but it is beautiful to look at the old wood. The natural light comes from the window next to it, in a clouddy winter day, I felt very much like playing after taking this shot. Enjoy!

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Panasonic DMC-G1
ISO 100
2.5 s
f/22
Manual white balance
45mm lens (micro four thirds), (equivalent to 90mm 35mm reflex)
-Pau Rey

I had to use food to get the cats to stay on the wall, unfortunately no more than four would ever be up there at the same time. This was taken after the sun was down so with the small aperture and polarizer I had to have quite a long exposure. This is why the grey cat's head is a blur. My actual focal point was somewhere around the orange cat.
Camera: Nikon D50
Lens: 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6
ISO: 400
Exposure: 0.6 sec
Zoom: 45mm
F-stop: f/16
-Quentin Swager

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Camera: Canon EOS Rebel T2i, Lens: Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS
shot at 23 mm, ISO 100, 4 sec., f/22
The rolls of film are some of the first rolls of film shot in over 45
years on a Zeiss Ikon purchased by my grandfather in 1937. The Rock'em
Sock'em Robots I won at an 80's party.

-Rob Lennox

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Living in a dense city posed some difficulties when trying to focus to infinity, so I decided to take the easy way out :). I ended up at Great Falls National Park to shoot .. nothing other than .. the Great Falls in Maryland. This was taken with a 50D, 28mm at f/18 with a shutter speed of 1/40.
-Ryan Meyer

Of course I waited 'till nighttime to try this one... Without any natural light I knew I'd have to keep this indoors and small-scale. The idea of putting a large depth into focus is a bit surreal, so I had the idea to play with perspective by manipulating the perceived height of some vinyl/plush figures. Since they're all in focus, they seem like they might all be the same distance from the camera, and therefor the same height. Actually the Cardbo robot is about 5.25", the Android plush is 9", and the Titus plush in back is 12.5" high. Canon Digital Rebel XTi, Tamron 17-50 f/2.8 at 17 mm and f/22, 0.8s, ISO 800. Adjusted white balance, exposure, shadows, noise reduction, and cropped in Aperture 3. I used the hyperfocal distance calculator found here, with a subject distance of 2 feet to calculate everything.
-Shaun Wrightson

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This is my first submission! Very excited for this and more. We had a family trip to the Pebble Beach area scheduled for this weekend and I planned some of my shots around this shooting challenge. What seemed natural was to try something with the Lone Cypress but, of course, my wife had to go and take this shot instead which blew all of my shots out of the water. Typical. Shot at 35mm, f/11, ISO 100, 1/125 sec. With the help of the scale on my lens and the detailed tutorials, figured this was a good aperture to get a very focused shot. A little touching up in Lightroom and this is what we got. My wife's the best.
-Shea Chen

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The shot was taken at Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL. I walked around the arboretum for about 30 minutes trying to capture hyperfocal photos. Having set out with my 18-200 lens, I shot various snow capped trees and ground snow. This low hanging branch was my best shot. I tried to capture the arch the branch made with the tree which made it a good candidate for hyperfocal photography.

Camera: Nikon D7000
F-Stop: f/22
Exposure time: 1/50th sec
ISO: 500
Focal length: 18mm

Near Focus distance: 7.9 centimeters
Far Focus distance: infinity
- Siddhaarth Rajkumar

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Shots taken with a Pentax K10D and a Tamron 18-200 F/3.5-6.3 XR LD Aspherical (IF) Macro. I shot this on 1/15/11 at 1:30. 18mm, ISO 200, f/13 at 1/1000.

I was racking my brain to think of an outdoor shot here in N Florida that I could use for the contest. Then I remembered this fountain on the Florida State University campus, which is in front of the Westcott Building, a Tallahassee icon. I forgot to take my DoF chart, so I approximated the distance and then used the DoF preview function to fine tune it. The image you see is pieced together from three bracketed exposures.

In your rules you didn't say anything about portrait vs. landscape so I used the long dimension to size them.
-Steve Coleman

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This shot was taken at Stanford University. In the background is
Hoover Tower, and the moon is in the corner. To reduce distortion of
the tower, I pointed the camera at the horizon and took a picture with
the camera oriented vertically, then I cropped the image to a
horizontal aspect ratio. Raw processed with Canon's software, then
cropped and color corrected in Photoshop.

21mm, f/20, 1/160, ISO 640
-Tom Haflinger

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I needed to get out of the house so I went over to the train track by my house. Wandered around for about an hour trying to snap a few good ones. Got this one towards the end.

Nikon D200 camera, 50mm 1.8 lens
ISO 100, f/11, 1/8s
-Vince Wilcox

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Camera : KODAK EASYSHARE C140 DIGITAL CAMERA

The pic was taken at Marine Drive. A stroll down Marine Drive is possibly the best way to discover Mumbai. This is a windswept promenade, flanked by the sea and a row of art deco buildings. Looped between the concrete jungle of Nariman Point, Mumbai's Manhattan, and the leafy green slopes of Malabar hill, Marine Drive was once called the queen's Necklace, strung with glittering street lights like an enormous strand of imperious jewels. It is also one of Mumbai's busiest roads
-VIVEK R. KABRA

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This is from the Biltmore Estate in Asheville, NC a few days after a fairly large (for the area) snowfall. Shooting the back of a statue of Diana down to the Biltmore House itself (about 1/3 miles). Taken with a Canon 5D, 24-70 f/2.8L at 24mm. ISO 50, 1/13 exposure at f/16. Converted to greyscale in Lightroom.
- Wesley Duffee-Braun

I was walking around Toronto and reading a book that talked about hyperfocal distance in street photography. I had a 35mm lens, a Leica M6 and 200 Kodak film.
This was a shot of chance and since I set it in hyperfocal distance it let me capture this image while I was walking across the sea of people. I was amazed with what I got after I got the film developed = )
-Wilfredo Raguro

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