Do you experience hearing loss but don’t use hearing aids? You’re not alone — only one in five people who would benefit from hearing devices actually uses them, according to the Hearing Loss Association of America.

Shopping for hearing aids can be overwhelming, especially if you’ve never done it before. There are so many brands, and each one can have multiple models. How are you supposed to find the best hearing devices for your specific needs? We did the work for you by researching the best hearing aids on the market and reviewing them below to help you determine which hearing devices are right for you.

The 7 Best Hearing Aids on the Market in 2022

  • Best Customer Service: Lively
  • Best-Fitting Hearing Aids: Phonak
  • Best Inexpensive Hearing Aids: Audien
  • Best Invisible Hearing Aids: Eargo
  • Best Hearing Aids for Seniors: Oticon
  • Best Hearing Aids for the Money: MDHearing
  • Best Hearing Aids for Severe Hearing Loss: Audicus

Why Trust Our Expert Review?

Hours of researchExperts consultedBrands consideredModels consideredModels selected
5,1001117955

Our experts independently research and recommend products we believe provide value in the lives of our readers. We’ve spent collectively more than 5,000 hours conducting in-depth research on hearing aids. Throughout this process, we did the following:

  • Engaged in ongoing independent research
  • Consulted with independent audiologists
  • Consulted with geriatric care experts
  • Mystery shopped the brands
  • Interviewed experts in the field
  • Read thousands of verified customer reviews from trusted third parties such as Better Business Bureau and Consumer Reports

A Snapshot of the Best Hearing Aids on the Market

Cost

Type

Bluetooth

Battery Type

Battery Life

Telecoil

Trial Period

Warranty

Financing

Lively

Starts at $1,195 per pair

RIC

Yes

Rechargeable, disposable

Depends on the model

No

100-day money-back guarantee, depending on state

3 years

Yes

Phonak

Depends on provider

BTE, RIC, ITE

Yes

Rechargeable, disposable

About 24 hours

Yes (Marvel model)

Depends on provider

1 year

Depends on provider

Audien

Starts at $99 per pair

ITC

No

Rechargeable

About 20 hours (depends on model)

No

45-day,  money-back guarantee

1 year

No

Eargo

Starts at $1,450 per pair

CIC

No

Rechargeable

16 hours

No

45-day,  money-back guarantee

1 year (2 year for Eargo 6)

Yes

Oticon

Depends on provider

BTE, ITE, RIC

Yes

Rechargeable, disposable

30 hours

Yes

30-day,  money-back guarantee

1 year

Depends on provider

MDHearing

Starts at $799 per pair

BTE

Yes

Rechargeable, disposable

Depends on the model

Yes

(AIR model)

45-day,  money-back guarantee

45 days

Yes

Audicus

Starts at $998 per pair

BTE, RIC, CIC

Yes

Rechargeable, disposable

About 24 hours

Yes

(Dia II model)

45-day,  money-back guarantee

1 year

Yes

The Best Hearing Aids Reviews

Best Customer Service: Lively 

Lively Hearing Aids

  • Cost: Starts at $1,195 per pair
  • Type of Hearing Aid: Receiver In Canal (RIC)
  • Type of Hearing Loss: Mild to moderately severe
  • Bluetooth Capabilities: Yes
  • Battery: Rechargeable and disposable
  • Telecoil: No
  • Warranty/Trial Period: 3-year limited warranty; 100-day money-back guarantee, depending on state
  • Financing: Yes

We picked Lively for Best Customer Service because the company offers three-year access to virtual, on-demand care from audiologists and a three-year warranty, topping the one-year average from other brands on this list.

On Better Business Bureau (BBB), Lively has an A+ rating and an average customer rating of 4.2 out of 5, with many reviewers expressing satisfaction with Lively’s knowledgeable customer service.

The three models that Lively sells are all RIC models and Bluetooth compatible. They connect with the Lively app to control hearing aid settings and have a 100-day money-back guarantee depending on what state you live in.

The main disadvantage to Lively is that there are a limited number of models and only one style of hearing aid. If you’re looking for a behind-the-ear (BTE), in-the-canal (ITC), in-the-ear (ITE), receiver-in-canal (RIC), completely-in-canal (CIC) or other hearing aid device, other providers on this list may be a better option.

Best-Fitting Hearing Aid: Phonak  

Phonak Hearing Aid

  • Cost: Depends on provider
  • Type of Hearing Aid: Behind the ear (BTE), receiver in canal (RIC) and in the canal (ITE)
  • Type of Hearing Loss: Mild to profound
  • Bluetooth Capabilities: Almost all models
  • Battery: Rechargeable and disposable
  • Telecoil: Almost all models
  • Warranty/Trial Period: 1-year limited warranty; trial period varies by provider
  • Financing: Depends on provider

Phonak offers two models of custom-fit hearing devices, earning our pick for Best-Fitting Hearing Aids. That’s because most other providers on this list offer only one custom model — if they offer one at all. One of the Phonak custom models, the Virto-B, is made from titanium for durability and is the company’s smallest custom hearing aid. The other, the Virto Marvel, is custom made to resemble an earbud and comes in three different variations.

Most Phonak hearing aids come with Bluetooth connectivity. They’re equipped to boost your hearing even in noisy environments. The brand also has a completely invisible hearing aid model called the Lyric

However, Phonak doesn’t sell directly to consumers. That’s not entirely bad news, though, since a hearing professional such as an audiologist can help determine the cause of your hearing loss and whether you even need a hearing aid in the first place. It also means you’ll get a hearing aid that’s perfectly fitted for your unique anatomy.

Best Inexpensive Hearing Aids: Audien 

Audien hearing aids

 

  • Cost: Starts at $99 per pair
  • Type of Hearing Aid: In the canal (ITC)
  • Type of Hearing Loss: Mild to moderate
  • Bluetooth Capabilities: No
  • Battery: Rechargeable
  • Telecoil: No
  • Warranty/Trial Period: 1-year limited warranty; 45-day, money-back guarantee
  • Financing: No

We named Audien as Best Inexpensive Hearing Aids because the company’s prices start at just $99 per pair and are well below the prices of other brands. The only other company on this list with a price you could consider cheap is MDHearing, which starts at $799 per pair.

The four Audien models are all ITC style, rechargeable and are designed to assist mild to moderate hearing loss. On Better Business Bureau (BBB), Audien has a B rating and an average customer rating of 4.04 out of 5.

But along with the low price come a few disadvantages. For starters, Audien offers a limited 45-day money-back guarantee (some companies offer longer), and its hearing aids are designed to be “one-size fits all”, meaning you get no personalized fitting and you’re on your own for adjustments. Also, Audien hearing devices come with no special features, such as Bluetooth, background noise reduction, telecoil or a mobile app for sound adjustments.

If price is your main focus and you’re looking for a simple, cheap ITC hearing aid without many features, Audien might be a good choice for you.

Best Invisible Hearing Aid: Eargo

Eargo Hearing Aids

  • Cost: Starts at $1,450 per pair
  • Type of Hearing Aid: CIC
  • Type of Hearing Loss: Mild to moderate
  • Bluetooth Capabilities: No
  • Battery: Rechargeable
  • Telecoil: No
  • Warranty/Trial Period: 2-year warranty; 45-day, money-back guarantee
  • Financing: Yes

For those looking for the best discreet hearing aids, Eargo offers four almost-invisible CIC models, and earns our pick for Best Invisible Hearing Aids. Most other providers on this list offer only one invisible hearing aid. Not only does Eargo offer more models of virtually invisible hearing aids, but the company’s models also come in a variety of price points — from the economical Eargo Max at $1,450 per pair to the most advanced Eargo 6 at $2,950 per pair. Plus, every model comes with free lifetime support from Eargo’s staff of licensed hearing professionals.

Eargo hearing aids don’t have Bluetooth capabilities since they’re CIC-style devices. CIC hearing aids typically don’t have Bluetooth since they’re completely in the ear canal, and the fluid around the ear canal blocks Bluetooth frequencies. For some, this may be a dealbreaker. However, users can still adjust the Eargo 6, Eargo 5 and Eargo Neo Hifi from the Eargo app using the charger’s bluetooth connection.

Best Hearing Aids for Seniors: Oticon

Oticon Hearing Aid

  • Cost: Depends on provider
  • Type of Hearing Aid: Receiver in canal (RIC), behind the ear (BTE) and in the canal (ITC)
  • Type of Hearing Loss: Mild to profound
  • Bluetooth Capabilities: Yes
  • Battery: Rechargeable and disposable
  • Telecoil: All styles but the CROS
  • Warranty/Trial Period: 1-year warranty; 30-day, money-back guarantee
  • Financing: Depends on provider

Oticon makes some of the best hearing aids on the market and earns our pick for Best Hearing Aids for Seniors for its range of hearing aids that are appropriate for all types of treatable hearing loss (from mild to profound), its wide variety of device offerings and its advanced sound processing technology (which the company claims helps support your brain’s natural sound processing ability). Also, Oticon hearing aids can connect to smart devices around your home, such as a smart doorbell, so it’s easier for caregivers to check in on the user.

All models feature Bluetooth connectivity and are available in multiple styles. Oticon has seven different models to choose from — most hearing aid brands offer only between three and five. So if variety and advanced technology are important to you, we recommend Oticon.

The one main drawback to Oticon is that you cannot buy its devices online. However, many seniors may actually prefer to purchase their hearing aids in person to ensure a customized fitting and that their hearing aids are programmed to their specific level of hearing loss. If you do prefer to buy hearing aids online, the rest of the providers on this list (except Phonak) sell their devices online.

Best Hearing Aids for the Money: MDHearing 

MDHearingAid Hearing Aids

  • Cost: Starts at $799 per pair
  • Type of Hearing Aid: Behind the ear (BTE)
  • Type of Hearing Loss: Mild to moderate
  • Bluetooth Capabilities: Yes, on the CORE model
  • Battery: Rechargeable and disposable
  • Telecoil: Yes, with the AIR model
  • Warranty/Trial Period: 90-day warranty; 45-day, money-back guarantee
  • Financing: Yes

MDHearing makes some of the best quality hearing aids for the money. While the company doesn’t offer custom-fitted hearing aids, the devices are some of the most affordable on the market. Starting at $799 per pair, MDHearing is the second most affordable hearing aid on this list, after Audien. However, MDHearing offers more special features than Audien, such as Bluetooth compatibility and a telecoil option (which connects to hearing assistive technology in places like the movie theater or church to help you hear the speaker). The mix of low prices with advanced features is why we named MDHearing Best Hearing Aids for the Money.

Given the low price, MDHearing may also be a good candidate for the Best Hearing Aids for Seniors, since seniors are typically on a fixed income (MDHearing is cheaper than Oticon, which we named Best Hearing Aids for Seniors).

The company also has an audiologist on staff to help answer any questions you may have, which is important support given that MDHearing is a direct-to-consumer company.

If the one-size-fits-all hearing aids don’t work for your ears, you have the option to send them back for a full refund within the 45-day trial period.

Best for Severe Hearing Loss: Audicus

Audicus Hearing Aid

  • Cost: Starts at $998 per pair
  • Type of Hearing Aid: Behind the ear (BTE), receiver in canal (RIC) and completely in canal (CIC)
  • Type of Hearing Loss: Moderate to severe
  • Bluetooth Capabilities: Some models
  • Battery: Rechargeable and disposable
  • Telecoil: Yes, with the Dia II
  • Warranty/Trial Period: 1-year warranty; 45-day, money-back guarantee
  • Financing: Yes

With three different models suitable for severe hearing loss, Audicus earns our pick for Best Hearing Aids for Severe Hearing Loss. Most other providers on this list offer only one or two hearing aids for severe hearing loss. 

Not sure of your level of hearing loss? Take the Audicus online hearing test. The company uses your results to program your hearing aids so they’re suited to your specific level of hearing loss. 

Audicus offers another perk in the form of its membership plan. Instead of buying hearing aids up-front, you can opt for the monthly membership option to take advantage of cost savings. Prices for the membership start at $39 per month and include a free replacement pair of hearing aids every 18 months as well as free cleanings, supplies and loss and damage insurance.

Keep in mind that the affordable price tag means that some devices come with fewer standard features. The brand’s most inexpensive models, for example, lack rechargeable batteries and Bluetooth capabilities.

What You Need to Know Before Buying a Hearing Aid

First, know that you’re not alone. Hearing loss affects almost 48 million Americans in at least one ear, according to the CDC. A hearing aid can help.

Before heading out to buy one, consider your budget and features wish list.

“Today’s hearing aids can include incredible features such as Bluetooth compatibility and apps to control and customize your listening experience. This makes it possible to directly link to your phone, TV, computer and more. This might be a critical feature for someone that is working from home or those with an active lifestyle,” says Dr. Hope Lanter, lead audiologist for Hear.com. There are also hearing aids for tinnitus and other specific conditions.

If you’re experiencing hearing loss, getting a professional hearing test before buying hearing aids is essential. A hearing professional can determine the cause of your hearing loss and whether it’s due to an underlying medical condition that may need separate treatment.

How Much Do Hearing Aids Cost?

The average cost of a pair of hearing aids is $4,600, according to the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology.

How Can I Save Money on Hearing Aids?

The best way to save money is to look for brands that offer financing or discounts. 

Medicare doesn’t cover the cost of hearing aids or hearing exams. Medicaid may offer some support, but since benefits vary by state you should check with your state’s Medicaid office for clarification. Those with Medicare C or a Medicare Advantage plan may have some benefits that apply to hearing aid coverage, but they should contact their plan holder to find out exact coverage details. 

You may also be able to use funds from your flexible spending account (FSA) or health savings account (HSA) toward purchasing a hearing aid. 

Ask your provider about potential coverage for hearing aid devices if you have private insurance.

How Do Hearing Aids Work?

Hearing aids magnify and process sound vibrations as they enter your ear, allowing you to hear sounds and speech better. 

There are two types of hearing aids: analog and digital. Most hearing aids on the market today are digital and have three parts.

The microphone picks up sounds around you. They are analyzed by a computer chip in the hearing aid, then converted into digital signals customized according to your degree and type of hearing loss. These signals are sent to an amplifier, which makes them stronger. The amplified signals are transferred to a speaker or receiver in the hearing device so you can hear them.

Some hearing aids have additional technology for an improved listening experience. These include:

  • Directional microphones: amplify sounds in front of you to help block out background noise and hear conversations better
  • Telecoil (also known as T-coil or T-switch): allows you to hear better on a wired telephone or in a public facility equipped with with assisted-listening technology. Most auditoriums, houses of worship, and public buildings have this technology.
  • Feedback suppression: cuts down on the whistling that can occur when a hearing aid user gets too close to a phone or other device

Different Types of Hearing Aids

The hearing aid style you choose will largely depend on your personal preference and how invisible you want the device to be. Styles include:

  • Behind-the-ear (BTE)
  • In-the-canal (ITC)
  • In-the-ear (ITE)
  • Receiver-in-the-canal (RIC)
  • Completely-in-the-canal (CIC)

Buying Hearing Aids In-Person vs. Online

A visit with a hearing professional, whether in-person or online, is the ideal option for finding a hearing aid solution that fits your needs. To receive the best hands-on care, you should get a hearing test in person. Getting a hearing test professionally administered ensures you get a hearing aid device explicitly customized to your degree of hearing loss. An audiologist can also tell you if your hearing loss is permanent or reversible and whether it’s caused by underlying health problems you might have otherwise not known about. 

For those who may still prefer an online experience, you can take an online hearing test and use your results to customize your hearing aid settings.

But no matter whether you plan to buy hearing aids online or in person, you should first see your doctor for a checkup and have your hearing tested by an audiologist, according to the Mayo Clinic. Doing so can help rule out correctable causes of hearing loss as well as assess your level of hearing loss.

How to Find the Best-Fitting Hearing Aid

Visit an in-person hearing professional who can customize the fit of a hearing aid to your unique anatomy. 

If you’d rather go through the process online and skip any consultation, opt for a product that comes with a trial period if the device isn’t a good fit for your ear. Most states stipulate that audiologists must offer a 30-day trial period for your hearing aids, according to the Federal Trade Commission. However, laws vary by state, so be sure to ask about the trial period before purchasing.

Other Important Factors to Consider

“High-quality hearing aids are precision instruments that need to be taken care of properly. Poor cleaning and maintenance of your hearing aids can reduce its lifespan significantly and generally impair its level of performance. The most important elements of hearing aid maintenance include keeping them safely stored, dry and clean,” says Dr. Lanter. 

Taking care of hearing aids is relatively easy. To keep them in tip-top shape, clean devices once a week, store them in a sealed container when not in use and avoid exposing them to extreme temperatures. “With appropriate care, the average hearing aid will last somewhere between four to six years,” adds Lanter.

Criteria for Choosing the Best Hearing Aids

We determined the best hearing aids based on the following criteria:

  • Price
  • Audiologist care
  • Warranty
  • Customer satisfaction
  • Customer service
  • Features such as Bluetooth capability and rechargeable batteries
  • Comfort and fit
  • Reliability

Bottom Line

With so many hearing aids on the market, there’s a device out there that will fit your needs.

If you’re looking for one of the best hearing aids on the market, Oticon devices may be for you. The company offers a variety of high-quality hearing aids with advanced sound processing technology. If you’re searching for the best hearing aids for the money, opt for a device from MDHearing. If you need the best hearing aid for severe hearing loss, Audicus is a good pick, and Eargo is our recommendation for the best invisible hearing aid. Finally, for the best-fitting hearing aid, go with Phonak for a professionally fitted device.

Frequently Asked Questions