New Results Challenge Basic Ideas of Supermassive Black Holes

Galaxies have supermassive black holes at their centers—our Milky Way, for example, has its own 4-million-solar-mass one, Sagittarius A*. Some astronomers have previously thought that there’s a simple relationship between the galaxy’s size, the black hole’s mass, and how much light the black hole spits out while it…

New Evidence That Supermassive Black Holes Eventually Suck the Life out of Big Galaxies

At the core of each large galaxy lies a supermassive black hole with the mass of 1 million suns. New research shows that these celestial vacuum cleaners do more than just devour nearby objects—they also grow to a size that eventually suppresses a galaxy’s ability to churn out new stars, effectively rendering them…

Binary Star System May Actually Be a Pair of Orbiting Supermassive Black Holes

Oops! Andromeda, our closest galactic neighbor, sits a measly 2.5 million light years away from Earth. Like the Milky Way, it’s a spiral galaxy packed with stars. Some of those stars orbit one another. That’s all good—but scientists have come to the realization that a particular light source, one assumed to be binary…