The 9 Best Photos of This Morning's Sunrise Eclipse

The 9 Best Photos of This Morning's Sunrise Eclipse

The Sun rose as a crescent over many parts of the world on Thursday morning.

Solar eclipse 2021 as seen from Toronto, Canada on June 10, 2021
The sunrise eclipse as seen from Toronto, Canada on June 10, 2021.
Photo: Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images (Getty Images)

Full disclosure: I slept through this morning’s solar eclipse, which is a real shame because watching the Sun rise over the horizon while being partially blotted out by the Moon is objectively one of the coolest things anyone is likely to see this year. I mean, I paid actual money to see Cruella, but I couldn’t get out of bed early enough to witness a wonder of space and nature. Anyway.

Thankfully, plenty of people did take the time to appreciate and record this spectacle. Here are photos from around the world, showing the crescent Sun in all its glory.

Rose Pastore is the science editor at Gizmodo.

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St. Petersburg, Russia

St. Petersburg, Russia

Illustration for article titled The 9 Best Photos of This Morning's Sunrise Eclipse
Photo: Dmitri Lovetsky (AP)

In this image from St. Petersburg, Russia, the silhouette of a bird can be seen in front of the partially eclipsed Sun. The Moon is currently at the farthest point from Earth in its orbit, which is why it appeared too small in the sky to create a total eclipse anywhere in the world.

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Baltimore, Maryland

Baltimore, Maryland

Illustration for article titled The 9 Best Photos of This Morning's Sunrise Eclipse
Photo: Julio Cortez (AP)

Some places on Earth saw the eclipse as a crescent—called a partial eclipse—while a few saw a “ring of fire,” in which a circle of the Sun could be seen behind the Moon, known as an annular eclipse.

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Arlington, Virginia

Arlington, Virginia

Illustration for article titled The 9 Best Photos of This Morning's Sunrise Eclipse
Photo: Bill Ingalls/NASA via Getty Images (Getty Images)

Even with much of the Sun covered, it’s still not safe to look at directly. Eclipse-viewing glasses are recommended for any solar eclipse, but it’s perfectly fine to look at lunar eclipses (which are more common than solar) without any special precautions.

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London, England

London, England

Illustration for article titled The 9 Best Photos of This Morning's Sunrise Eclipse
Photo: Chris J Ratcliffe (Getty Images)

Photographing a solar eclipse can be tricky, too, since the light can still harm your eyes through the camera lens. Instead, view the scene through your camera’s electronic screen display if it has one.

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Scituate, Massachusetts

Scituate, Massachusetts

Illustration for article titled The 9 Best Photos of This Morning's Sunrise Eclipse
Photo: Scott Eisen (Getty Images)

Here, a gloomy Sun rises over Scituate Harbor in Massachusetts.

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New York, New York

New York, New York

Illustration for article titled The 9 Best Photos of This Morning's Sunrise Eclipse
Photo: Gary Hershorn (Getty Images)

The next time a solar eclipse will be visible in New York will be on April 8, 2024. Some parts of the U.S. will even get to see that event as a total eclipse—yep, the big one, when day turns to night as the Moon fully blocks the Sun.

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Lewes, Delaware

Lewes, Delaware

Illustration for article titled The 9 Best Photos of This Morning's Sunrise Eclipse
Photo: Aubrey Gemignani (Getty Images)

Animals notice solar eclipses, too. EarthSky has a great article about the many weird ways animals react to the darkened Sun, including trying to go back to sleep.

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Beijing, China

Beijing, China

Illustration for article titled The 9 Best Photos of This Morning's Sunrise Eclipse
Photo: Ng Han Guan (AP)

The contour of the Moon can be seen in this photo from Beijing. It almost looks like a normal sunrise.

The next eclipse viewable from North America will be a partial lunar eclipse on November 18-19, 2021. Unlike during a solar eclipse, you’ll be able to use a telescope or binoculars to get a good look.

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Rose Pastore is the science editor at Gizmodo.

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