Since Google wants to control all forms of communication, the logical next step is being not just what you do on the internet, but how you access the internet as well. To do that, they'll deploy 1Gbps fiber to you.

The company is going to test this super high speed internet to "a small number of trial locations across the United States," and give somewhere between 50k to 500k people an amazingly fast pipe. What's the point of this?

* Next generation apps: We want to see what developers and users can do with ultra high-speeds, whether it's creating new bandwidth-intensive "killer apps" and services, or other uses we can't yet imagine.
* New deployment techniques: We'll test new ways to build fiber networks, and to help inform and support deployments elsewhere, we'll share key lessons learned with the world.
* Openness and choice: We'll operate an "open access" network, giving users the choice of multiple service providers. And consistent with our past advocacy, we'll manage our network in an open, non-discriminatory and transparent way.

We basically read that as bridging the gap between webapps and desktop apps by making the connection so fast that most people won't be able to tell the difference. And, forcing other ISPs to upgrade their pipes to compete with Google, since they say it's going to be released at "a competitive price". Think of it as the Nexus One of service providers. Google is going to make an offering that's better than other comparable devices/services in order to make everyone else play catch-up.

So, if you want my address, Google, to know where you need to deploy the test, you've probably got it already. Seriously man, I need this. [Google]