TouchRetouch Free: A dead simple (and free!) photo editor. You can easily "photoshop" flaws in your photo out of the picture. It's the quickest way to touch up photos, just mark the things you want out with your finger (with a brush or lasso tool) and then hit the 'Go' button and it'll be outta there.


DSLR Controller: It's still in Beta but DSLR Controller lets you control your Canon DSLR with your Android phone or tablet. It's expensive-ish at $8.50 but for photogs you're able to tinker with ISO, shutter speed, aperture, exposure compensation and zoom, not to mention live view, auto-focus, manual-focus, the histogram, grid display, bulb capture, continuous capture, white balance...the list goes on. Could be useful.


The Week's Best Android AppsS

FOX Sports Mobile: If you're not satisfied with the ESPN or Live Scores on Android, Fox Sports just released an app to help you keep track of scores, videos, breaking news, your local teams and more. You can personalize the app to display the relevant news stories and scores about your team and keep track of all the popular sports. Pretty solid for sports fans.


The Week's Best Android AppsS

Streamzoo: As Instagram isn't available on Android, people need to look elsehwere for their photo sharing needs. Streamzoo is a photo and video sharing app that lets you share the pics you take, along with being able to hashtag and organize 'em. Of course, you can add hipster filters, borders and tilt shift effects to make your picture look snazzy. Supports Twitter and Facebook too. [via Androinica]


The Week's Best Android AppsS

Light Flow: It doesn't work for every phone but you can take control of the notification light on your Android light. You can change colors, cycle through 'em all, program apps to work with it and a whole ton of other customization. It's a small tweak but one that makes your phone, yours. [via Phandroid]


The Week's Best Android AppsS

Visidon AppLock: It's a security app meant to protect other people (not you) from opening apps on your smartphone. But unlike password or gesture-based security systems, Visidon uses facial recognition software to do so. So if you're protecting Gmail with Visidon, let's say, the app will prompt a facial scan before it reveals Gmail. If it's you, it quickly registers and opens Gmail. If it's not you, users are prompted to enter a password. If they can't do that, then no peeky at my teeties.


The Week's Best Android AppsS

Skype: Skype's 2.1 Android app just got updated to add 2-way video calling to a wide range of Android phones and tablets now, including Samsung's Galaxy S, S II and Galaxy Tab; HTC's Desire, Thunderbolt, Sensation and EVO 3D and 4G; plus a bunch of Sony Ericsson devices.


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