Facebook Status Updates Are About to Leak Into the Rest of the Web

Facebook's just taken the next step towards becoming an inescapable part of the very internet itself. Starting today, Facebook will be rolling out Embedded Posts, meaning that you'll eventually be able to embed your status updates into all the third-party websites your heart desires.

Facebook Status Updates Are About to Leak Into the Rest of the Web

The embedded status updates will appear exactly as they do on Facebook, so you'll be able to display picture, videos, hashtags, and whatever else you might want to share with the world. To embed posts, simply hover your cursor over the little arrow in the righthand corner of your status, scroll down on the pop-up menu to "Embed Post," and you'll be offered a few lines of code that you can then paste into the internet at large. Of course, only those status updates set to "public" will be embeddable.

Facebook Status Updates Are About to Leak Into the Rest of the Web

The cool part, though, is that if you view an embedded Facebook status from a third-party site, you're fully able to interact with it just like you would on Facebook (liking, sharing, commenting, etc.). Currently, the only sites playing nice with the new feature are Bleacher Report, CNN, Huffington Post, Mashable, and People, but Facebook promises that a "broader availability will be coming soon."

Technically though, Facebook is late to the game here, and the move really isn't a surprise. Twitter's allowed users to embed tweets for a while now, and this is just another brick in the social media fortress being built around the internet we once knew. A major chunk of any new internet-based service requires a Facebook or Twitter account to register, and rarely a minute goes by that you're not prompted to like, retweet, fav, share, check-in, or some other form of telling the world what you're thinking.

These major social media networks are only going to become more intrinsic to web use as time goes on. Now, it's just a matter of time before we wake up one day to find that the internet has become a giant, interconnected monster of social network blather. [Facebook]