Reframe Roundup: This Week's Best Photography Posts

Did you guys know there is a Gizmodo subdomain where you can go for all things photographic? Yep! It's called Reframe, and it's where you'll find additional coverage of gear, techniques, news, and all kinds of great stuff related to the crafts of photography and videography.

10 Amazing Photos From the Museum of Natural History's Online Archive

Reframe Roundup: This Week's Best Photography Posts

Today, the American Museum of Natural History put online their entire catalog of archival images. The Digital Special Collection consists of over 7,000 photos, slides, and illustration spanning the world over. We sifted through the pile and picked out a few favorites.


Step Inside The Historic Photo Archive Stored In an Underground Mine

Boyers, Pennsylvania, is home to the Iron Mountain storage facility, a former limestone mine that is now the storage site of more than 15 million photographic negatives and prints, all preserved hundreds of feet underground. This documentary, produced by the Hillman Photography Initiative, takes you inside for a glimpse at the collection and the folks who maintain it.


This Hack Gives Your DSLR 9 Hours of Battery Life

Take a 10,000mAh Anker battery and a DC coupler from Amazon, add a hot-shoe plate and some industrial strength velcro, and throw it all at your DSLR. Nope, it's not a craft project—it'll give your camera an amazing 9 hours of battery life.


Sony A77 Mark II: The Mid-Range DSLR Gets a Turbo-Charged Upgrade

Reframe Roundup: This Week's Best Photography Posts

Most of the attention heaped on Sony these days is directed at their compact mirrorless cameras. But there is still plenty of interest in those other members of the Alpha family, those larger A-mount DSLR style bodies. The a77 Mark II brings some long awaited updates to the table.


Photos of Fences in Brooklyn Make Urban Eyesores Beautiful

Reframe Roundup: This Week's Best Photography Posts

There are certain tropes you see when walking the streets of any big city, most of which are so banal they never cross your mind. Charles Johnstone makes it his photographic endeavor to catalog some of these phenomena, as in his Brooklyn Fences series.