Can't stay glued to your RSS and Twitter feeds all day? No problem. BitStream corrals all the small interesting news and rumors from the past day so you don't have to.

The slow, painful death of a retail icon

Yesterday, RadioShack officially filed for bankruptcy, a move that was plans and rumors up until this point. This is pretty much a killing blow as RadioShack plans to sell up to 2,400 of its stores in the United States.

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Now, RadioShack is like a rotting corpse being pulled apart by zombie corporations. Amazon has plans to snatch up some of the stores to give a massive boost to its brick-and-mortar presence and Sprint will keep a small shell of RadioShack alive in its own stores with Sprint selling its service and RadioShack providing all the parts and accessories.

It's a sad fate for sure, but one that's seemed inevitable considering the online boom of the last decade. To quote a now soul-crushing 2014 Super Bowl commercial, the 80s wants its store back. Maybe it's best to remember the store in its glory rather than its downfall.

Microsoft's HoloLens is sooo 2012

When Microsoft announced its HoloLens augmented reality headset a few weeks back, it was a one-more-thing style surprise. The headgear, along with its Windows Holographic platform and brand new processor, seemed to come out of nowhere. Except it was actually leaked almost three years ago.

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Engadget's Ben Gilbert returns to 2012 when a massive 56-page document, outlining the Xbox One's future and Hololens. Of course back then, Microsoft had tons of different names for it, such as Kinect Glasses, Project Fortaleza, and Screen Zero. At first, it seemed that HoloLens was destined to be an Xbox peripheral, or at the very least gaming focused. Although Microsoft did have a neat (in theory) concept of Minecraft using the headset, the company seems more focused on the HoloLens becoming the next evolution in computing than just an Xbox One add-on.

Take a look at the whole 2012 leak and how the future of Microsoft was laid bare—and almost no one noticed. [Engadget]

Rumortown

  • Leaked sketches show that the upcoming Galaxy S6 could be shorter and thinner than its predecessor. [Phone Arena]
  • Google and Mattel will be announcing something on Feb. 13. We're guessing a Google Cardboard Viewmaster but we'll see. [Android Central]
  • Only days before Microsoft pushes out its Windows 10 mobile preview (hopefully), new images of the operating system surface. [Windows Central]

Your Apps, Updated

  • Dropbox has launched a whole new way to open documents in native apps, which should make web-based collaboration even easier. [Dropbox]
  • TweetDeck, the most awesome Twitter client that you definitely should be using, will finally support GIFs. My life just changed forever. [The Next Web]
  • More Android apps make their way to the Chrome platform thanks to App Runtime for Chrome and include Slideshare, Tapatalk, and Yo. [Google Chrome]
  • Apple has released Photos for Mac to developers and one things certain at least—it's better than that terrible, terrible iPhoto mess. [Wired]

De(vices)

  • People were none too happy when AT&T decided to brand the Nexus 6. It looks like Verizon will be following AT&T's unfortunate lead. [Android Police]
  • Google Glass is dead. At least the goofy lenses we remember are. But Google isn't giving up, and Glass 2.0 will have a completely different design. [The New York Times]

Bucket of Random

  • Assassin's Creed Rogue reaches a new milestone as the first title to bring eye-tracking controls to video games. [Polygon]
  • Dish's Sling TV gives us some reprieve for cord-cutters but Disney's CEO says not to expect an ESPN standalone service any time soon. [Engadget]

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