Sony: War is Peace, Freedom is Slavery, Ignorance is Strength, and PS3s are Selling Quite Well

I'm going to let you guys in on a secret that I snuck out of the Sony marketing playbook. Shh, don't tell anybody, OK? Here it is: people are stupid, and if you lie to their faces they will believe it. If you're in the middle of a disaster, tell people your company has never been better. If the biggest product launch in your company's history is tanking, tell people it's selling like hotcakes. If you say it enough times, it'll become the truth!

You don't have to look far for an example of this type of Dubyaesque behavior in action. Here, let me lay a nice quote down on you, courtesy of Jack Tretton, the CEO of Sony Computer Entertainment America, shouting some horseshit:

"April or May is when we feel like we're going to catch up to demand and have product fully in stock across North America and stay there."
Wait a second, are you trying to claim that there are shortages of PS3s out there? That somewhere in this vast country there is a kid who really wants to drop $600 on a PS3, if only he could find one? What fantasy world are you living in, Sony?

So, if you've shipped 4 million units but only sold 2 million, how is it possible the PS3 is hard to find? Is EBGames hoarding a million units for a massive St. Patrick's Day sale we don't know about?

This is like when you claimed victory in the Blu-ray vs. HD DVD debate. Guess what, Sony? Blu-ray is sinking like a chubby mafia snitch and it's bringing your precious PS3 down with it. No one is buying them because they're insanely overpriced and there are no blockbuster games for it. To claim that there's a shortage is an insult to the intelligence of anyone who has even a passing knowledge of the state of current consoles.

I'm looking forward to tomorrow, when we can expect Sony to come out with a statement claiming that the PS3 cures diabetes and should be covered under Medicare. You're losing, Sony. Man up, admit it, and make things right for you and gamers everywhere.

Reuters [via Kotaku]