Welcome to Yale Med, Here's Your iPad

The full curriculum for the Yale medical program—if stacked—stands roughly four feet tall and costs the school $100k annually to copy, sort, and collate. But, starting this Fall, Yale Medical is replacing the stack with Apple's top-of-the-line tablet.

The Yale initiative provides first through fourth year medical students with complete access to the entire year's course materials—digitally—with zero paper materials. Luddites among the student body, however, may still receive the paper version at an extra expense.

The information is split among lower- and upperclassmen—the first and second years receive the more general courses, while the third and fourth years receive more tailored information on their chosen specialties. Residents are even expected to bring the iPad on rounds to manage patient data and take notes.

"We recognized that we were spending a lot of money on curriculum materials that our students were not always using and that the format of the materials was not the most conducive for learning," said Michael Schwartz, assistant dean for curriculum at Yale School of Medicine, in a press release. "We had a lot of of paper that had to be recycled, which was expensive and not very green, so we started wondering if there was a better way to do this."

After a successful 9-student pilot program this spring, the school will be distributing about 520 64 GB, 3G iPads as well as a Bluetooth wireless keyboard this year. So, if you find yourself in the hospital and your doctor mentions he's a Yale Man, remind him you're not an Angry Bird. [Yale Daily News via MacWorld - Image: Stocklight / Shutterstock]


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