Image: facebook.com / andrew.hall.3910

If you’re someone who occasionally puffs on electronic cigarettes, you should stop right now. Because when shit goes awry, it turns into a disgusting scene of blood, charred skin, and broken bones.

Advertisement

An Idaho man claims he lost seven teeth and suffered second-degree burns to his cheek after his vaporizer pen exploded in his face. Andrew Hall, of Pocatello, says he was getting ready for work on the morning of January 14 when his vaporizer pen unexpectedly exploded. Hall later shared extremely graphic photos of the incident on his Facebook page.

“I’ve been doing this for about a year now and assure you I did not do anything I wasn’t supposed to (battery was in right, always had the shop put it together when I first bought it and add things and maintenance it the right way while taking their advice),” Hall said, “But it exploded in my face. I’ve lost at least 7 teeth, 2nd degree burns to face and neck and have been pulling chunks of plastic, teeth and foreign objects from mouth, throat, and lips.”

Advertisement

Hall has continued to update friends (and other interested parties) through his Facebook account. He posted several images of his home that show how the explosion left burn marks in his home’s bathroom—and also how the force of the explosion was strong enough to break the edge of his bathroom sink.

One of the photos posted to Hall’s Facebook page shows the remains of the LG HG2 battery, one that’s often used in larger vaporizers called “mods” that generate more vapor.

Advertisement

Sponsored

“I had my twisted rda on at the time and was using my brown LG HG2s g for my battery, just pulled off charger and these pics are from my bathroom where it exploded,” Hall says in the post.

Of course, this isn’t the first time that an electronic cigarette has spontaneously combusted. There have been several other incidents involving exploding vaporizers around the country. Batteries are often believed to be the reason for exploding vaporizers. In 2014, the US Fire Administration reported, “the shape and construction of e-cigarettes can make them more likely than other products with lithium-ion batteries to behave like ‘flaming rockets’ when a battery fails.”

In this case, Hall was using a LG HG2 INR18650 LiMn 3,000 mAh battery to power the device. For reference, the exploding Galaxy Note 7 was powered by a 3,500 mAh battery of about the same size.

We’ve reached out to Mr. Hall for comment and will update if or when we hear back.