Yahoo's Redesigned Email Is Seriously Broken (Updated)

Yahoo Mail got a pretty extensive (and familiar looking) redesign last week, but it seems there are some serious problems under that freshly-painted hood. And folks on Yahoo's bug reporting board sure aren't happy about it.

As ZDNet reports, some users are seeing addresses disappear from contacts lists or sent messages being erased from folders. There's uproar over the design features of the new look, too, with users clamoring over the removal of Mail Tabs and sort by sender or subject options. And the Print button is nowhere to be found — Yahoo's answer for now is to use Command-P. Any new redesign will have some growing pains, but these problems hobble the basic way email should work, and no amount of logo re-jiggering can cover that up.

Update: A Yahoo spokesperson reached out with some helpful information. First, regarding addresses disappearing from users' contacts lists:

[W]e're freeing up usernames that were inactive for at least 12 months. As part of this recycling process, if an inactive account is listed within a Yahoo address book, it is automatically removed when the account is recycled. This is so that we can ensure that email is sent to the intended recipient. Any other information such as phone numbers, mailing addresses, or alternate email addresses within the contact remains. If a user believes their Yahoo Contacts were removed in error, we encourage them to review this help article about restoring missing contacts for more information.

As for the other features that seem to have disappeared:

- "Delete" is now a quick action that appears on hover (as a trash can) that is available per message or per conversation.
- "Sort by sender" is also now available as a quick action that appears on hover (as a magnifying glass) and is available on a per message basis. It is a fast and easy way to search by sender.
- New emails are now highlighted with a color ball to the left. You can toggle the read/unread status by clicking on that ball. It is more efficient than before.

[ZDnet]