Beautiful Collapsable Cubicles Are an Office Rat's Dream Come True

Illustration for article titled Beautiful Collapsable Cubicles Are an Office Rats Dream Come True

The cubicle is a horrid monster of office design. While they might be functional, it's never pretty to section off your office into endless false walls, resigning workers into their own little pockets of a giant ice cube tray. The designers at Taylor and Miller Architecture and Urban Design have a beautiful solution that even packs in some extra features.

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Instead of relying on a series of modular walls, Taylor and Miller's system revolves around sleek wooden slabs mounted on a track, each with a built-in, foldable desk of its own. When not in use, all the slabs can be slid into a big space saving cube. When it's time to get down to business, the slabs can be accordioned out with hand cranks, like an old-fashioned filing cabinet but for people instead of papers.

The system just took the jury prize in the office interiors category of the Architizer A+ Awards for its design, and damned if they aren't the only cubicles we've ever seen that look like a joy to work in. The installation process might be a bit much for most cubicle-happy employers, but a drone can dream, can't he? [Architizer]

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Illustration for article titled Beautiful Collapsable Cubicles Are an Office Rats Dream Come True
Illustration for article titled Beautiful Collapsable Cubicles Are an Office Rats Dream Come True

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DISCUSSION

theghostofjimmadison
The Ghost of James Madison's Rage Boner

The last place I worked—and I worked in an office, mind you—we weren't allowed to call them "cubicles." HR seriously went on a crusade to get everyone to call them "workstations." One of my colleagues was actually reprimanded for making an offhand remark about "cubicle rats." A douchey thing to say, to be sure, but a formal reprimand seems like overkill.

On topic, if I worked there, I would harbor this nagging suspicion that my employer intended to use the sliding function in order to store its employees neatly when they weren't needed.