This Is What Touching Your MP3s Looks LikeS

Digital versus analog is a bitter war with no winner, and shouldn't be fought in the first place. Listen to your music how you please. But the C60 project aims to please both sides—physical cards trigger digital songs.

This Is What Touching Your MP3s Looks LikeS

The project is more of a design concept than an actual product, of course—but it raises interesting questions about the way we consume music. Tapes are dead dinosaur bones. Vinyl records—still alive—but a hipster connoisseur's indulgence, for the most part. Most of us play songs with clicks at the very most—in the touchscreen era, it's now mostly taps. Are we losing something by not touching music—even if that loss is nothing more than a nostalgia-fest?

This Is What Touching Your MP3s Looks LikeS

Even if you couldn't care less about this physical versus digital media debate, the object—created by Martin Bone and Kara Johnson—itself is pretty stellar, in both appearance and design. Underneath the box's sheen lies an impressive array of interlocking RFID antennae, which lie in wait for song-tagged cards. The process is simple. Each card corresponds to a song on your computer. Toss on a card to play a song—or toss on seven and make a playlist. Or, jumble them all together to—that's right—shuffle MP3s with your bare hands. Even as a prototype, it's a fun take on listening to music with friends, and probably more compelling than scrolling through an iTunes library when you're deliberating your next listen. [Core77]