iPhone Apps of the Week: Office 365, Skymotion, and More

It was a huge week for Apple—especially anything software related. While we'll have to wait and see how the fruits of WWDC's labor turn out, there's plenty of other app makers out there still churning away. And as you can see in this week's set of apps, they've got some good stuff.


iPhone Apps of the Week: Office 365, Skymotion, and More SkyMotion: Weather apps are a dime a dozen, but accurate weather apps are a little more rare. For most of them, you'd be better off tossing a coin to try to figure out if it's actually going to rain or not. And that's where SkyMotion shines—down to the minute. [Free]


iPhone Apps of the Week: Office 365, Skymotion, and More MTV: MTV has had something resembling an iOS app before called WatchWith, but their parent company Viacom has given it a total content overhaul and renaming it just plain old MTV. The new, improved, and most importantly on-demand app is stuffed full of content, both new and old. [Free]


iPhone Apps of the Week: Office 365, Skymotion, and More Filedrop: We finally have AirDrop for iOS—which is great news! But that still doesn't change the fact that you can only share between Apple devices, leaving your Windows brethren high and dry. Fortunately, a similar service called Filedrop just hit iOS, meaning you're free to share and share alike. [Free]


iPhone Apps of the Week: Office 365, Skymotion, and More

Figure 1: There are not—nor will there ever be—any filters in Figure 1, a new iOS photo-sharing app that approximates the fruit of an unholy union between Instagram and the Discovery Health Channel. Instead, clarity is key, since the app supplies users with a steady photo stream of very real, very not-for-the-faint-of-heart medical oddities and diseases. [Free]


iPhone Apps of the Week: Office 365, Skymotion, and More Microsoft Office for iOS: After countless months of "will they" or "won't they," Microsoft has finally conceded to give iOS users their very own version of Office in app form. Most iOS users, that is. Assuming they want it in the first place, which is no safe assumption given its many, many limitations. The first thing to keep in mind is that Office for iOS literally isn't for everyone. To access the app, you need a $100 per year Microsoft Office 365 subscription, and there's no iPad version yet. That's going to be a hard sell for anyone who isn't already knee-deep in the exciting world of Excel under any circumstances. It's especially daunting given that Office for iOS is going to be a companion at best. [Free with Office 635 subscription]