This Massive Alienware Gaming Monitor Uses Samsung's Next-Gen QD-OLED Technology

Alienware didn't say how much the 34-inch monitor would cost, but you might as well start saving now.

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Alienware 34 monitor
Image: Alienware

Alienware’s new gaming monitor is massive, curved, and has a generous 1440p resolution, but I don’t really care about any of that. What grabs my attention, and what should be why you might spend big bucks on this monitor, is the QD-OLED technology it uses.

I know, another damn acronym. This one, though, is easy to follow. The QD stands for Quantum Dot and the OLED is organic light-emitting diodes. You’ve probably heard of these separately if you’ve shopped for a TV in the past few years, but together, they promise improvements to both of their individual parts.

Alienware 34 monitor
Image: Alienware
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The hybrid technology takes the self-illuminated pixels of an OLED panel and enhances the colors by converting blue LED pixels to pure red and pure green pixels through a quantum dot layer. Without using filters, colors transformed by the quantum dot layer loses very little energy, allowing the panel to create a wider range of colors and a higher peak brightness than a regular white OLED screen.

The result is a monitor with a 99.3% DCI-P3 color coverage and a Delta-E color accuracy of below 2. If that’s all gibberish to you, it means colors should look vibrant yet natural. Even more impressive is the 1,000-nit brightness rating which might well burn through your retinas if you aren’t careful.

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Alienware 34 monitor
Image: Alienware

We’ll comment more on the display quality once we get one of these into our (home) office; until then, we can only ogle at the specs. These include a 34-inch, 3440 x 1440-pixel display with a gentle 1800R curve, a 175Hz refresh rate (over DisplayPort, HDMI is limited to 100Hz), and a 0.1-millisecond gray-to-gray response time. The panel supports VESA DisplayHDR 400 True Black and has an anti-reflective coating to reduce glare. And in case anything was missing, the Alienware is Nvidia G-Sync Ultimate certified and includes low blue-light technology.

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If you somehow pull your eyes away from the panel, you’ll find a stand that will match the rest of Alienware’s products. Pushing the sci-fi aesthetic, the monitor has a sleek white-and-black color scheme with RGB lighting on the rear, bottom, power button, and customizable on a loop centered on the rear monitor. The monitor is height adjustable and can swivel (-20 to 20 degrees), slant (-5 to 5 degrees), and tilt (-5 to 21 degrees).

Alienware 34 monitor
Image: Alienware
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Picture settings, including the ability for content creators to swap between DCI-P3 and RGB color ranges, can be adjusted via the OSD 5-axis joystick. Ports are positioned on the bottom and include dual HDMI 2.0 inputs, a DisplayPort 1.4, two USB downstream inputs, one USB upstream, and separate audio and headphone jacks.

Alienware hasn’t revealed pricing but it’s safe to assume this thing will cost a small (or perhaps not so small) fortune when it arrives in North America on March 29 and in Europe on April 5.

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Update on Jan 13: A typo in Alienware’s press materials said the resolution was 3440 x 1400. We’ve updated this article with the actual resolution: 3440 x 1440.