Screenshot: Oklahoma Game Wardens (Bumble/Facebook)

It’s probably not a good idea to brag about crimes on a dating app until you’re certain your match isn’t a cop—or a game warden.

Last month an Oklahoma hunter matched with a 24-year-old man named Cannon Harrison. Not realizing her new connection is a game warden for Oklahoma’s Department of Wildlife Conservation, the hunter told Harrison about her recent kill.

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After the two exchanged initial greetings, Harrison asked the women how she was.

“Oh I’m great. Just shot a bigo buck. Pretty happy about it,” the woman responded.

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“Hell yeah, get em with a bow?” Harrison asked, as the season to hunt deer with rifles had ended at the beginning of December, but bow hunting is still legal through mid-January.

“Well we don’t need to talk about that,” she responde.

But Harrison, seeing that his personal and professional life were overlapping, did want to talk about that. “Haha spotlight?” he asked, referring to the illegal practice of virtually freezing a deer with a spotlight.

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“Yeahhhh”

Harrison then asked where the kill took place and she responded with the location of her ranch. The warden asked for a picture and the hunter sent three: one of her holding the buck’s antlers, one of the headless body, and one of the decapitated trophy head in the bed of a truck.

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The Oklahoma Game Wardens posted the exchange on its Facebook page (along with the gruesome photos). “As Game Wardens our personal lives are often blurred into our professional lives,” the post reads. “This is often the case when it comes to social media, personal cell phones, and now dating apps....”

“You can’t just ignore a broken law that falls right in your lap but was kind of a bummer,” Harrison told Tulsa World. 

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Harrison told the Washington Post he initially thought the woman was pranking him, since so many people in his rural county know him as the game warden. Once he realized it wasn’t a joke, he was reportedly able to find out the woman’s full identity through social media. Game wardens arrived at her property the next morning.

One Facebook commenter responded to the photo of the head, “She is guna get to pay some big ole bucks in fines.” The Tulsa World reports the woman and an accomplice will have to pay $2,400.

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[Washington Post, Tulsa World, Oklahoma Game Wardens/Facebook]