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Laser TV Technology: Plasma and LCD Killer?

Illustration for article titled Laser TV Technology: Plasma and LCD Killer?

Two companies blurted out some boisterous bluster today, saying they have laser TV technology that can smack down LCDs and plasma displays because their idea costs half the price, looks twice as good, is half the weight and thickness, and only uses a quarter of the electricity. Big talk.

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Aussie company Arasor and its stateside partner from the Silicon Valley Novalux say their combination of a unique optoelectronic chip and a laser projection device will be available by Christmas, 2007 and placed inside TVs made by companies such as Mitsubishi and Samsung.

These are bold claims from this couple of companies, but don't expect everyone to be throwing away those brand-new LCDs and plasma displays just yet. A lot can happen between now and December, 2007.

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Laser TV unveiled [News.com.au]

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DISCUSSION

I'm most interested in that "half the price" part of the story...

If I remember correctly from 7 years ago, LCD was proclaimed to be cheaper to make than CRT (...and now, today, 7 years later, a 20 inch LCD of any kind is still a bit more expensive than a 20 inch CRT...though granted, it's higher resolution...but apparently with people proclaiming "cheaper" 7 years ago, they really meant "cheaper eventually.")

SED is also supposed to be cheaper to make than LCD...$10 says when it comes out, it'll be more expensive than LCD for at least a couple years.

And I bet if these Laser TV's come out, they'll be more expensive too.

Why do they even bother declaring the "cheaper than xxx" part of the spec if they're just going to charge more for it anyway? In my book, cheaper means the cost to get it at my local electronics store...not some lofty idea of what it might cost to make the thing in 5 years if conditions a, b, and c are met in the market.