Sony's NW-A910 Series Video Walkman Smallest and Lightest for TV

Illustration for article titled Sonys NW-A910 Series Video Walkman Smallest and Lightest for TV

Sony's latest Video Walkman series, the NW-A910, is to be released next month in Japan. Available in 16GB, 8GB and 4GB models, Sony claim it's the smallest and lightest device to watch and record digital TV on. And that's not all:

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Illustration for article titled Sonys NW-A910 Series Video Walkman Smallest and Lightest for TV
Illustration for article titled Sonys NW-A910 Series Video Walkman Smallest and Lightest for TV
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Illustration for article titled Sonys NW-A910 Series Video Walkman Smallest and Lightest for TV
Illustration for article titled Sonys NW-A910 Series Video Walkman Smallest and Lightest for TV
Illustration for article titled Sonys NW-A910 Series Video Walkman Smallest and Lightest for TV
Illustration for article titled Sonys NW-A910 Series Video Walkman Smallest and Lightest for TV
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The 16GB model can record up to 100 hours of digital terrestrial TV, programmable up to a month in advance on MPEG-4 AVC/H.264 format. The battery will give you 36 hours' use if you're using it to play tunes on, and 6 hours if you're watching stuff. There's a noise-canceling function, and the 2.4-inch liquid crystal screen has 320 x 240 resolution.

Music-wise, you can record from CD and MD players, it supports ATRAC, AAC, MP3 and WMA, and there are five sound modes to choose from: heavy; jazz; pop; unique; and custom. Oh, and you can store your pics on it as well.

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Prices are around 45,000 for the 16GB A919, 35,000 for the 8GB A918 and 30,000 for the 4GB A916. That's $389, $302 and $259 respectively. [Impress through Google Translate]

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DISCUSSION

Just enough buttons for the comfort level of users who want SOME buttons.

Apple's not the only ones being choosy about the formats they implement on their devices. I can easily name one other OS/Hardware maker. At least Apple's blessed formats of H.264 and AAC are open standards, if not radically popular ones (yet).

That said, the previous commenter is right: Sony needs to be agnostic. It's tough for them... they've been clinging to proprietary technologies more than any other company I can think of for a LONG time (MD, MS, ATRAC, etc.) but their recent adoption of more common formats in their products has been embraced by consumers. They should pick up that ball and run with it.

This thing's sexy too... it totally reminds me of my Clié NX-80v.