Vote 2020 graphic
Everything you need to know about and expect during
the most important election of our lifetimes

The First Self-Contained Airbag Jacket Detects Crashes All On Its Own

Illustration for article titled The First Self-Contained Airbag Jacket Detects Crashes All On Its Own

Motorcycle jackets with built-in airbags are far from being a new life-saving innovation, but Dainese’s new Misano 1000 works completely independent of the bike being ridden, increasing the odds of it inflating when it’s needed most.

Advertisement

Typically these types of jackets rely on sensors that have been installed on the motorcycle to know exactly when to inflate in the event of an accident. But that makes it difficult for a rider to frequently switch bikes, and doesn’t guarantee the airbags will inflate in every scenario. The same goes for corded tethers that trigger the jackets when the rider is separated from the bike; they just don’t account for every accident scenario.

Illustration for article titled The First Self-Contained Airbag Jacket Detects Crashes All On Its Own
Advertisement

So for its new Misano 1000, Dainese has succeeded in integrating all of the electronics, sensors, and GPS hardware into the jacket’s back protector. Six sensors in all monitor the motion and movement of the rider 800 times every second, and in the event of a sudden and extreme change in movement—like during an accident—they intelligently decide when to inflate the two-inch air bladder that surrounds the riders most vital body parts.

Pricing will be close to around $1,700 when the Misano 1000 jackets are available come November, which isn’t cheap, especially considering it will probably need serious repairs once the airbags deploy. But it’s another one of those scenarios where you probably won’t regret spending the money the day it saves your life.

[Dainese via Gizmag]

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

unbelievablyred
UnbelievablyRed

I don’t really understand how the airbag would inflate in time. Since the rider is likely to separate from the bike in an accident, the rider wouldn’t start decelerating until they hit something, which seems like it would be too late.

It’d be like gluing the airbag sensor in a car to the driver’s face. Wouldn’t go off until you’ve already faceplanted into the steering wheel.