The Resolution of the iPad 3's Retina Display Compared to the iPhone and iPad

Illustration for article titled The Resolution of the iPad 3s Retina Display Compared to the iPhone and iPad

Chris Koerner was curious about what the oft rumored resolution of the iPad 3's Retina Display would look like compared to previous iOS devices, so he whipped up a little image that compared each devices' resolution against each other. The 2048x1536 screen would dwarf everything.

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If the 2048x1536 iPad 3 retina display turns out to be real this year, oh god almighty it's going to be glorious. A 1080p image would be smaller than the iPad 3's display! And remember, all those pixels would only be on 9.7-inches (probably). The 2048x1536 display has been the resolution long expected on the next iPad because it's double the resolution of the first two iPad's screen (1024x768), when the iPhone's Retina Display was introduced, it was double the resolution of the previous iPhone's screen.

Illustration for article titled The Resolution of the iPad 3s Retina Display Compared to the iPhone and iPad
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Check out the full, original image made by Chris Koerner. [Clkoerner]

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DISCUSSION

I suppose I

It probably won't have a 2048x1536 display for many reasons:

1. the pure processing power required to render that resolution is quite large. ( an understatement)

2. Designing for that large of a resolution would be awful. iOS devs usually do not use vector graphics so pixelation at its finest (rendering the retina display moot).

3. There is no widespread content available at that resolution and you must still factor in PHYSICAL size. Yeah, the iPhone's retina screen is great, except when you have to press some smaller buttons or web links. As in, congratulations, you have 1080p video: watch it in native resolution on a 4.3" fraction of your screen, or use even more processing to stretch it to fullscreen! :D

4. technical limitations of scaling, bandwidth of buses, etc.

5. JK, everything follow a linear trend right!?! Chris Keorner must be correct!