This Ingenious Nightstand Prints Photos and Scans Handwritten Notes

Illustration for article titled This Ingenious Nightstand Prints Photos and Scans Handwritten Notes
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Countless projects have tried to figure out how to retain some of the tangibleness lost in our increasingly digital world. Few of them have done it as convincingly as Tableau, a beautifully simple, Twitter-connected photo printer and scanner.

As designer John Kestner deems it, Tableau is an "anti-computer" experience. But the other, glass-half-full reading is that Tableau is a super intelligent piece of furniture, a Twitter-connected nightstand that can print photos and scan handwritten notes. In short, it makes digital things physical and physical things digital.

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Illustration for article titled This Ingenious Nightstand Prints Photos and Scans Handwritten Notes

The only interface is the nightstand's drawer—drop things in the drawer and they get scanned and posted to Twitter; notice the knob is glowing and open the drawer to pick up your followers' printed photos. The nightstand, which is connected to the internet via Wi-Fi or cellular network, prints the photos on Zink paper and is itself constructed wholly from reclaimed materials.

Tableau is currently on exhibit at the Saint-Étienne Biennale 2010, though Kestner's website says that it's in development for wider production next year. And while computing power is getting retrofitted into familiar objects all the time, it's refreshing to see an instance in which an object doesn't shout its connectedness from the mountain tops. [John Kestner via Designboom]

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DISCUSSION

IceMetalPunk
IceMetalPunk

This is awesome. I just wonder how it knows when you want it to scan stuff. If I open the drawer, find some printed pictures, and close it again, I don't want it re-scanning the empty drawer (or the printed photos if I didn't remove them).

Is it like a twist of the knob or something? That would make sense...

I kind of want it. But I wish I could set it up not to look at Twitter. Instead I'd rather it look at a specific E-Mail address for attachments or something. Then I could create a special E-Mail address just for this...

As for how the scanning would work in that case, maybe a bit of handwriting recognition/OCR would allow me to write the recipient's E-Mail address in the top-left corner of the page that I scan? Then the entire image would be sent as an attachment?

-IMP ;) :)