This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.
This image was lost some time after publication, but you can still view it here.

The inimitable Om Malik writes about his experience in India where broadband is defined as 200 kbps. This is based on the FCCs decision to wiggle the definition of broadband in the U.S. down to what folks would consider a crawl in any other country.

Ironically, this 200 kbps definition of broadband is becoming a noose around our necks. Bruce Kushnick, the founder of Teletruth in an report points out that 13 years ago, the definition of broadband was 45 megabits per second, but then FCC changed it. To 200 kbps. He thinks precisely for those reasons FCC might be inflating the broadband penetration rate data.

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In truth, the U.S. is 16th in terms of real broadband penetration, after just about every other developed country in the world. This is absolutely ridiculous. Oh, but wait! We have 3G and CDMA running at 100 kbps in an open field on a clear day 50 feet from a cell tower. We're living in Future Town! Robot, fetch me my food pills.

Anyway, I don't need to rant here. Om does a much better job.

200 KBPS is Not Broadband [Gigaom]

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