Most Beautiful Items: June 15 - June 21, 2013

It's the longest day of the year, so I don't really know what you're doing not being outside right now. But since you're here, take a moment to check out some of the best pieces of art, architecture, and design, we found this week.


Who cares about plastic 3D-printed models of your head when an amazing, ornate room is being 3D printed out of sandstone? Digital Grotesque, as the project is called, looks like it was ripped from the frames of a sci-fi film.


Most Beautiful Items: June 15 - June 21, 2013

Hutong Vs. Highrise: A Photo Essay On China's Radical Urban Changes

Beijing is one of the earliest still-existant cities planned around a grid: the old city is organized around a chessboard-like matrix of alleys, known as hutong, that date back at least a millenium. But as developers in Beijing scramble to built modern towers in the urban core, hutong are disappearing.


Most Beautiful Items: June 15 - June 21, 2013

There's a great scene in the first season of Mad Men where Don unveils a campaign for Bethlehem Steel. "New York, Chicago, and Detroit—all brought to you by Bethlehem," reads the copy. The client rejects the pitch, but the sentiment itself was hard to argue with: steel from those small rustbelt towns was feeding the…


Most Beautiful Items: June 15 - June 21, 2013

Did you know there's an abandoned swimming pool in the basement of the Woolworth Building? Did you know there's an abandoned Cold War-era missile silo buried under a log cabin in the Adirondacks? Do you have any idea what happened with the filming location ofGhostbusters or Annie Hall? Nope! But Nick Carr, the…


Most Beautiful Items: June 15 - June 21, 2013

In Vietnam, it's common to use bamboo baskets to catch fish and eels. Less common? To find the same type of bamboo structures supporting an entire building. This open-air beauty is the Kontum Indochine Cafe, in central Vietnam, and it looks like it's supported by 15 giant bamboo fishing baskets.


Most Beautiful Items: June 15 - June 21, 2013

New Yorkers rarely have time to stop and look up at the city around them, but the Museum of Modern Art is pushing us to do just that with a city-wide scavenger hunt that challenges players to explore the city's architectural landmarks.


For most of us, lighthouses are synonymous with trips to the shore. But for seafarers, lighthouses have represented a vital symbol of safe passage for centuries. In fact, they go back to 280 BC, when the famed Lighthouse of Alexandria was built—though lighthouses of the ancient world looked more like battlements than…


British architect Richard Rogers is known for putting the guts of buildings on display. In fact, his work has even inspired the scatological style known as Bowellism. This summer, Rogers' exoskeletal style is being writ large in London, where he's building a wedge-shaped tower called the Leadenhall Building. And lucky …


Tomás Saraceno's M.O. as an artist is to make you float—either on top of millions of yards of plastic, or inside of hexagonal sky pods, or on top of an inflatable balloons. His latest Jules Verne-tinged installation, which opened today, is no different.


The last time James Turrell staged a major installation in a New York museum, lawsuits ensued: two visitors, who ostensibly didn’t realize what they were in for, sued Turrell after they became disoriented and fell inside of an installation in 1980. Thankfully, that hasn't stopped Turrell manipulating our senses—in…