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A robot started writing a Torah today. It will finish in 3 months.

Illustration for article titled A robot started writing a Torah today. It will finish in 3 months.

A robot started writing a Torah today at Berlin's Jewish Museum. It's part of an art exhibition that will see the robot finish its work — 304,805 Hebrew letters later — in 3 months. The exhibit will be up until January 2015.

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From the Associated Press:

The Torah-writing robot was developed by the German artists' group robotlab and was presented for the first time Thursday at Berlin's Jewish Museum. While it takes the machine about three months to complete the 80-meter (260-foot) -long scroll, a rabbi or a sofer — a Jewish scribe — needs nearly a year. But unlike the rabbi's work, the robot's Torah can't be used in a synagogue.

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Illustration for article titled A robot started writing a Torah today. It will finish in 3 months.

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DISCUSSION

dopaminegirl
Dopamine Girl

"But unlike the rabbi's work, the robot's Torah can't be used in a synagogue" - why exactly is this? I mean, when the Torah was written there weren't even printing presses, let alone robots, so what religious rules prohibit mass produced Torahs from being used ceremonially when there were no conceivable means of mass production when these rules were first created?