AT&T Palm Centro Official

Illustration for article titled ATT Palm Centro Official

The Palm Centro is losing its Sprint-only roots and going to AT&T for $99 after rebate with a two-year contract. That's the Glacier White color combo, and in a month there'll be an Obsidian Black version. It's essentially the same phone that Sprint offers, but this is a quad band GSM version with EDGE (no 3G). I don't like the ads, which try to portray the OS as somehow radically changed from business to social phone, but it's still a good deal for $99. [ATT, Thanks Dave for the tip on the embargo lift]

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Illustration for article titled ATT Palm Centro Official
Illustration for article titled ATT Palm Centro Official
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Illustration for article titled ATT Palm Centro Official
Illustration for article titled ATT Palm Centro Official
Illustration for article titled ATT Palm Centro Official
Illustration for article titled ATT Palm Centro Official
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Illustration for article titled ATT Palm Centro Official
Illustration for article titled ATT Palm Centro Official
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Illustration for article titled ATT Palm Centro Official

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DISCUSSION

@uptonogood:

The problem you have is that you fail to understand that the world has moved past the label "phone" just like computers are no longer only for "computing". What you said is similar to saying that you want a computer with nothing but a simple keypad for numbers and 8 led lights to display a byte at a time in binary.

If you're in North America then you might have missed it a little bit, but it'll get there too eventually: the world of computing is going mobile. Over the next couple of years you'll see plenty of devices that you'll have a hard time defining whether they are "computers" or "phones". Take a look at the HTC Shift as one example, or the Nokia N810 as another. People want to have all the power of a computer, but in their pocket. Why? Because they realize that a lot of the time when they need computers they aren't actually at home or at work by the computer! That's why the device formerly known as "mobile phone" is becoming so important. At the same time gaming is moving off the PC and watching movies from Bit Torrent is more important than running Word and Excel on your PC. That means that devices like an iPhone are actually in many ways much more suitable "computers" that the devices you currently think of as computers.

A lot of the things on a modern mobile phone don't make sense when you measure them against the values and use-cases of 1990. E.g. one could safely say that mobile phone cameras still suck compared to "actual" cameras. Yet people love them and use them! Why? Because the old usage of snapping a photo, waiting a week to have it developed, putting a print in an album and showing it to friends a year later at a party.. well, that's just not a very interesting use case compared to what people do now: snap a photo and instantly share it with a number of friends, regardless of where those friends are. For example: you're on vacation in Thailand and want to send a personal post-card to your friends and family. It doesn't matter if the quality is not perfect for this use case!

Computers have already evolved from room-sized gizmos to mainframes, desktops and more recently laptops. This isn't the end of the line. Computers will get small still and more personal still. The devices you call "phones" will be part of the DNA in what your kids will call "computer". Another part will be devices like UMPC's, tablet-PC's, the Asus EEE's and Sony Vaio UX-50's of the world. When Apple comes out with their UMPC/tablet that people won't be able to categorize in their heads as either as a computer nor an iPhone, people in North America are going to start to believe and understand this too... Personally I'm surprised the iPhone didn't already make people get it.