Explore the Ocean Deep in a Personal Submarine

Illustration for article titled Explore the Ocean Deep in a Personal Submarine

If you ever find yourself staring out at the sea, thinking, "Holy shit, I have way too much money. I should blow some of it on a personal submarine," the Deepflight Super Falcon Mark II is here to part you from that troublesome cash.

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Measuring just under 19.6 feet long by 9.8 feet wide, the 4,000-pound Super Falcon Mark II is comprised mostly of carbon reinforced composite and can whisk a pair of people down to 393 feet below the surface. What's more, it employs a pair of stubby "wings" and a powerful, brushless DC motor to "fly" through the water at speeds up to 6 knots rather than simply sink to the bottom as a research vehicle, like Alvin, would.

Illustration for article titled Explore the Ocean Deep in a Personal Submarine

As with all personal submarines, Deepflight places passenger safety first and foremost. The Super Falcon is positively buoyant so that in the event that the engine dies, the vehicle will automatically float to the surface. Should it get trapped underwater, the vehicle maintains a pair of redundant, 12-hour life support systems as well as both underwater and VHF radios for communication.

There's no word on pricing for the Super Falcon, but given the array of high-end accouterments—from its carbon fiber seats and fly-by-wire controls to optional integration with your yacht— and the fact that they're built to order, you can bet that it's going to cost way more than what you've got saved up. Though if you're in a pinch for a personal submarine, you could always just rent Sir Richard Branson's. [Deepflight 1, 2 via UnCrate]

DISCUSSION

mwhite66
mwhite66

Nice, but designs like this worry me. This seems to be a sealed "dry" sub with the interior at 1 atmosphere. If that's so, by my rough estimate even at a modest depth of only 30 feet the force holding hatch closed is something like 20 tons; there's simply no way to get out if you need to. Like if its lithium batteries catch fire. Or something. It can't be all that buoyant or you couldn't get it to dive, so it would take a while to float back up to the surface. Big subs have air locks that let you escape if you need to, but this one seems to me like a death trap if something goes wrong.