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Florida Man Sues Apple for $10 Billion, Says He Invented the iPhone in 1992

Illustration for article titled Florida Man Sues Apple for $10 Billion, Says He Invented the iPhone in 1992

Florida man Thomas Ross believes that he divined the future of human communication 15 years before Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone. Ross scribbled together a patent application for a device back in 1992 and now claims that Apple stole his design. Now, the Florida man is suing Apple for over $10 billion.

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Illustration for article titled Florida Man Sues Apple for $10 Billion, Says He Invented the iPhone in 1992

Okay so this thing doesn’t even look like an iPhone besides the fact that it’s rectangular and has a screen. The Frankenstein of a device is also just a kitchen sink of every possible thing you could think to put in a handheld gadget in 1992, like a cell antenna, MS-DOS, solar cells (!), and a 3.5-inch diskette drive (!!!). It even has a physical keyboard. One of the iPhone’s biggest innovations, mind you, is the fact that it doesn’t have a keyboard. Ross didn’t even bother to use a straight edge when drawing his design, so it’s a complete mess of tech that no one in their right mind would build in 1992 or ever.

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A proto-Kindle? Maybe. The Apple Newton? You’re getting warmer. But not an iPhone. Not even close.

There’s the tiny problem of these patents not actually being patents anymore, since the plaintiff failed pay the appropriate registration fees. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office declared the application “abandoned” in 1995. Regardless, Ross is asking for $10 BILLION in damages plus 1.5 percent royalty on Apple’s sales, which comes out to about $3 or $4 billion a year.

Good luck with that, Florida man.

[MacRumors via The Telegraph]

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DISCUSSION

evrenseven
Evren Seven

Patent Examiner/ former Patent Attorney here: One day back at the firm, my managing partner called me into his office to let him know that someone had called him about filing a patent. This person had (sigh) been on a “vision quest” with a shaman, and taken hallucinogens which (sigh) caused him to travel forward in time in his consciousness, where he saw the press release of the cure for cancer, and they showed the chemical formula which memorized, and he wanted a patent for it. His only question... “one possible gotcha” as he called it, was whether the shaman had to be listed as a co-inventor, because he didn’t want to have to split the billions. So, I had to write a letter to this guy, saying that because he (sigh) saw the formula in his vision quest, but did not actually take part in its invention, he could not get a patent. I had to write that letter.