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How Much Does it Cost to Power Your Christmas Lights?

Illustration for article titled How Much Does it Cost to Power Your Christmas Lights?

So, you've gone to great pains to fully research your Christmas decorations, and now you have a kick-ass light set-up adorning your house. But how much is it all costing you?

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Electricity doesn't come free, after all—which is why Rob Cockerham armed himself with a power meter and worked out exactly how much his neighborhood was spending on electricity charges for its Christmas lights. Here's a rundown of how much you're spending per hour. Calculations assume that electricity costs 12¢ per kilowatt hour.

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A Small Tree

Illustration for article titled How Much Does it Cost to Power Your Christmas Lights?

Around 15 watts = 0.2¢ per hour.

Image by ilmungo under Creative Commons license


A Dumb Animal Sculpture

Illustration for article titled How Much Does it Cost to Power Your Christmas Lights?
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Around 100 watts = 1 ¢ per hour.

Image by lizjones112 under Creative Commons license


A Big Tree

Illustration for article titled How Much Does it Cost to Power Your Christmas Lights?
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Around 250 watts = 3¢ per hour.

Image by Justin Lee under Creative Commons license


A Hundred Incandescent Outdoor Globe Lights

Illustration for article titled How Much Does it Cost to Power Your Christmas Lights?
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Around 350 watts = 4¢ per hour.

Image by eggiepooh under Creative Commons license


A Modest House Like This

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Around 2,400 watts = 28¢ per hour.

Image by Rob Cockerham


An Insane House Like This

Illustration for article titled How Much Does it Cost to Power Your Christmas Lights?
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Up to $686 per hour (but much less if you use LEDs).

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Image of the The Faucher Family house in Delaware

[Rob Cockerham via Boing Boing; Top image by jspad under Creative Commons license]

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DISCUSSION

I've got just 3 sets of LED lights on a timer that runs for 6 hours each night. So at 42 hours/week x 6 weeks (generally up by Thanksgiving, down by New Years), it should cost me around $0.17 for the season. I am curious however how much it costs to run my neighbor's gaudy setup. Who needs a blow up Xmas themed Micky and Minnie Mouse teeter-totter. The damn thing is powered by a mini version of the blowers that keep bouncy castles going and they run it dusk to dawn in addition to all their other lawn crap.