McIntosh Teaches Its 50-Year-Old Tube Amp a Few New Tricks

Illustration for article titled McIntosh Teaches Its 50-Year-Old Tube Amp a Few New Tricks

Audiophiles love tube amps because of the warm, full sound they provide. But the vacuum tubes wear out, and generally requires a specialized, increasingly rare, technician to diagnose which ones are bad. High-end audio manufacturer McIntosh say their redesigned MC275 tube amp remedies part of that problem.

Advertisement

No, McIntosh hasn't gone and designed an everlasting vacuum tube. But it has built an indicator into each tube which will alert you to which specific tubes have gone bad. This saves you time and money tracking down a niche repair shop. Also, if you haven't noticed, this thing is also slick looking.

This is the 50th anniversary edition of the MC275, a product built to endure decades of use. Able to push 75 wats into 4,8 or 16 ohms, the latest edition of the MC275 has a frequency response of 10Hz-70,000Hz with a tolerance of +/- 0.5db between the 20Hz-20,000Hz range. And if you're looking to go all out with your sound system, the amp can be yours in December for $6500. [McIntosh]

Illustration for article titled McIntosh Teaches Its 50-Year-Old Tube Amp a Few New Tricks
Illustration for article titled McIntosh Teaches Its 50-Year-Old Tube Amp a Few New Tricks
Illustration for article titled McIntosh Teaches Its 50-Year-Old Tube Amp a Few New Tricks
Illustration for article titled McIntosh Teaches Its 50-Year-Old Tube Amp a Few New Tricks
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled McIntosh Teaches Its 50-Year-Old Tube Amp a Few New Tricks
Illustration for article titled McIntosh Teaches Its 50-Year-Old Tube Amp a Few New Tricks
Advertisement

DISCUSSION

Giggity

I remember when our TV's were tube powered. When one blew, you called a TV repairman and he would come out with a big bag full of tubes and test each tube until he found the one that was bad. The tubes would glow after warming up. TV's didn't come on instantly, you had to wait until the tubes were warmed up and when you powered off, you got that tiny little dot in the middle of the set that would slowly fade away.