The U.S. Is Kicking Off 2023 With Another Dangerous Winter Storm

The South, Midwest, and Plains can expect rain, snow, and tornadoes this week.

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Jack Stanton checks his ice covered home after being battered with waves from Lake Erie along Hoover Beach on December 27, 2022 in Hamburg, New York.
Jack Stanton checks his ice covered home after being battered with waves from Lake Erie along Hoover Beach on December 27, 2022 in Hamburg, New York.
Photo: John Normile (Getty Images)

A little over a week after severe winter weather pummeled much of the U.S., another winter storm is barreling its way across the country. The “multi-hazard” storm is going to bring a medley of hazardous conditions to several states this week, CNN reported.

“A significant winter storm will shift from the central Plains to the Upper Midwest through Tuesday and Wednesday. The storm will bring areas of heavy snow, ice, severe thunderstorms, and heavy rainfall,” the National Weather Service tweeted on Monday.

Gulf states and up into the Tennessee Valley are especially vulnerable to the storm. That area is expected to see damaging winds, isolated instances of large hail, and tornadoes tonight and into tomorrow. Several cities, including Baton Rouge in Louisiana and Montgomery and Mobile in Alabama, are under enhanced risk from the storm today, according to a first-day outlook from the National Weather Service Storm Prediction Center. Yesterday, the National Weather Service also announced a three out of five risk of severe weather with the potential for tornadoes for all of Arkansas, Northern Louisiana, and some of Oklahoma. The Birmingham Alabama’s NWS Twitter account has confirmed that several counties have reported damage from the rain and storm, and asked that area residents remain alert for changing weather conditions.

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The storm formed last week and hit usually arid California with thunderstorms and heavy rainfall that triggered flooding around Sacramento, San Francisco, and Oakland, NPR reported. At least one person reportedly died from the flooding. The storm also created rockslides, and residents across the affected area experienced power outages.

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Now that the storm has moved east, about 35 million people will be impacted by the severe weather, said Bill Bunting, chief of forecast operations for the NWS Storm Prediction Center, according to the New York Times.

This storm comes after a massive Arctic blast that killed more than 60 people and stranded thousands during their holiday travel.