RCA's 1969 Two Thousand TV Was Computerized Vision of Future, for $2,000

Illustration for article titled RCA's 1969 Two Thousand TV Was Computerized Vision of Future, for $2,000

Back in 1969 RCA made an attempt at a high-end TV that was a vision of the sets of the year 2000. The Two Thousand was even made in a limited run of 2,000 and cost $2,000. That's around $12,000 in today's money, but for that price you got a 23-inch Hi-Lite tube that had "such a vivid, detailed picture" you could "even watch it in a brightly-lit room." There were even "computer-like "memory circuits" that stored your fave channels, and preserved settings for volume and picture control. That must've seemed like the future indeed in an era of dial-twiddle-tuning to find the right VHF channel. The full advert page makes fascinating reading.

Illustration for article titled RCA's 1969 Two Thousand TV Was Computerized Vision of Future, for $2,000

"No motors, no noise and no moving parts to wear out," just computer-designed "electronic memories"... fabulous, especially since I remember hunkering down before our old TV to swirl the dial. My Dad used to get me to change the channels, as a kind of intelligent remote control. Nowadays my cat brushes past the touch-controls on my flat-screen LCD TV and does that job for me. [Paleofuture via Boing Boing Gadgets]

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There were even "computer-like "memory circuits" that stored your fave channels, and preserved settings for volume and picture control

My actual year 2000 TV (HD widescreen) does not even do this, and it has plenty of "memory circuits". Despite the fact that we tend to separate audio amplification from the TV, in this day and age there has to be a way to switch a channel or source device and have the system remember all of the audio settings. Or maybe I just have not invested in the "2010" equipment that can do it yet?

I suppose you could use a remote like the Harmony to change the settings, but even there I do not believe there is a way to set the exact volume when switching a source or a channel, is there?

Technology simply can not keep up with the brilliant minds of 1969, apparently.