RIM: Our BBM Core Switch Failed. Then Our Back-Up Failed.

Illustration for article titled RIM: Our BBM Core Switch Failed. Then Our Back-Up Failed.

BlackBerry maker RIM has released a statement on the ongoing BlackBerry Messenger service failures, saying that pretty much everything broke at once. And there's now a big backlog of sexts to process.

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According to a statement issued by RIM, the network's "core switch" failed, whatever a core switch might be, while the back-up system designed to kick-in in such a crisis scenario also failed to work. Which created the core meltdown of BlackBerry's messaging system.

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Here's RIM on the developing BBM downtime nightmare:

The messaging and browsing delays being experienced by BlackBerry users in Europe, the Middle East, Africa, India, Brazil, Chile and Argentina were caused by a core switch failure within RIM's infrastructure.

Although the system is designed to failover to a back-up switch, the failover did not function as previously tested.

As a result, a large backlog of data was generated and we are now working to clear that backlog and restore normal service as quickly as possible..

Incredible to see such a full, global problem, effecting users from Europe, Asia and South America. It must be one hell of a big switch. [BBC]


Illustration for article titled RIM: Our BBM Core Switch Failed. Then Our Back-Up Failed.
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A core switch is the one central point through which all network traffic flows in a private network. If you imagine a spoked wheel as a network, with numerous spokes representing each device attached to the network, the core switch is the hub of the wheel. Directly or indirectly, every device on an enterprise network talks to and is connected to everything else through the core switch. It is a single point of failure.